When Workers Dug Up This 600-Year-Old Plague Pit, Two Victims Were Discovered Mysteriously Entwined

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Image: JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images / via Daily Mail

Deep beneath the streets of London, a new railway is being built. As heavy equipment shifts earth that’s lain untouched for centuries, a team of archaeologists slowly sifts through the debris. Then, suddenly, they come across something incredible. In a pit filled with the remains of plague victims, two skeletons have an eerie bond.

Image: JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images

In May 2009 developers in London, England, began work on a new underground train line. Dubbed Crossrail – and later the Elizabeth Line – its goal is to relieve pressure on the city’s busy existing network. But as work continues on the groundbreaking line, some rather unexpected discoveries have begun to surface.

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Image: JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images

Throughout the course of construction, all sorts of relics have cropped up on the Crossrail site. From Roman horseshoes to medieval animal bones, all manner of surprises have been turned up in the earth beneath the capital . In fact, there have been so many that a team of archaeologists has been assigned to document them.

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