Historians Dismissed These Doodles By Da Vinci, But They Contain A Massive Discovery For Science

ADVERTISEMENT
Image: Leonardo Da Vinci

For years, the red scribbles below the drawing had been passed off as inconsequential. They were, researchers believed, nothing more than idle doodles. However, a recent study by a professor from the University of Cambridge has revealed that the supposedly meaningless markings are actually of enormous significance.

Image: University of Cambridge

It was Ian Hutchings, Professor of Manufacturing Engineering at the University of Cambridge, who took a closer look at the markings on the page. Even though a museum director in the 1920s had claimed they were “irrelevant notes and diagrams in red chalk,” Hutchings thought that there might be something more to them – and he was right.

ADVERTISEMENT

Image: Leonardo Da Vinci

Leonardo Da Vinci was a polymath. Indeed, he turned his hand not just to painting, but to a wide range of subjects including invention, architecture, sculpture, cartography and astronomy. Born in 1452, he passed away in 1519 at the age of 67, and by the time of his death he’d produced around 13,000 pages of notes.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT