These Haunting Photographs Of Auschwitz Prisoners Are Even More Harrowing In Color

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Image: Faces of Auschwitz/Auschwitz Memorial Museum via Mirror / Scott Barbour/Getty Images

Brazilian Marina Amaral – born in 1994 – was reading international relations at university. However, her twin passions for history and photography led her to abandon her studies to become a full-time artist, and her chosen medium is the colorization of historical photographs. It represents a skill that she’s honed to perfection – and one she’s recently used for a project that combines a poignant sense of horror with a deep respect for humanity.

Image: Facebook/Marina Amaral – Photo Colorization

Amaral’s interest has been captured by a wide variety of historical periods, ranging from the Civil War to World War Two. That was evident when she partnered with historian Dan Jones to publish a book in 2017: The Colour of Time: A New History of the World, 1850–1960. But the subject that she’s been drawn to time and again is the Holocaust.

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Image: Ernst Hofmann or Bernhard Walte

This momentous Nazi abomination saw the mass murder of some six million Jews as well as the liquidation of homosexuals, Gypsies, left-wingers and others. Between the years 1941 and 1945, the Nazis in fact murdered around 65 percent of the European population of Jews. And of these people, many were gassed in the industrial murder factories at death camps such as Auschwitz. Others, meanwhile, were shot and then put in the ground in mass graves.

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