Pioneers On The Edge of The American Frontier Really Did Live In These Astonishing Stump Houses

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Image: via TheVintageNews
Image: via The Vintage News

Part of the struggle of life lay, moreover, in simply finding the supplies to build a home. While the settlers of the Pacific Northwest lived in dense woods, home to wolves and bears, they nevertheless had to compete with logging companies in order to secure usable timber.

Image: Museum at Campbell River Collection
Image: Museum at Campbell River Collection

And although enormous trees and vast forests were being felled, this valuable lumber would be sent elsewhere. What the settlers were left with, then, was a landscape of scrap wood and stumps. As a result, they would not be building cozy log cabins; instead, with tenacity and hard work, they had to make the best of the situation at hand.

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Image: City of Vancouver Archives/Major James Skitt Matthews
Image: City of Vancouver Archives/Major James Skitt Matthews

In fact, the settlers decided to make use of their landscape of stumps. You might wonder what good a tree stump would be for building a house – but these stumps were big. Cedar trees and giant redwoods, for example, could be as much as 20 feet or so across at the base.

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