This Secret City Shot Up From Nowhere During WWII. Then Years Later Its Deadly Purpose Was Exposed

ADVERTISEMENT
Image: Underwood Archives/Getty Images

So, in the days following the Battle of Pearl Harbor, the U.S. formally entered World War II. Its citizens were expected to support the nation in its mission, too, meaning life would ultimately change dramatically for the average American. Some of these advancements turned out to be more significant than others, though.

Image: Howard R. Hollem/FSA/Epics/Getty Images

For one thing, America’s need for weapons increased, and armament factories obviously needed workers. But with many men joining the military, the duty of making war-related materials largely fell to women. And so, lots of female citizens became riveters, electricians and welders – for the very first time in most cases.

ADVERTISEMENT
Image: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

American life changed outside of work hours, too. Communities rallied together, collecting scrap metal to help with the war effort, and families had to make do with rations on their clothes, gas and meals. Meanwhile, so-called “victory gardens” sprang up in a bid to feed the nation with home-grown vegetables.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT