This Secret City Shot Up From Nowhere During WWII. Then Years Later Its Deadly Purpose Was Exposed

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In the days following the Battle of Pearl Harbor the U.S. fully entered the war. And the population was expected to support the nation in its mission. As a result, life was about to change dramatically for the average American. Some alterations, though, turned out to be rather unexpected.

Image: Howard R. Hollem/FSA/Epics/Getty Images

As America’s need for weapons increased, armament factories then needed workers. With many men joining the military, though, the duty of making war-related materials fell to women. And so females became riveters, electricians and welders for the very first time.

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Outside of work hours, communities rallied together collecting scrap metal to help with the war effort. Families found their clothes, gas and food rationed. Meanwhile, so-called “victory gardens” sprang up in a bid to feed the nation with home-grown vegetables.

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