The Scientist Who Found The Titanic Was Actually On A Top-Secret Military Operation

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Image: Prinz Adalbert
Image: via Wikimedia Commons

A short time before midnight on April 14, 1912 – fewer than five days after it had set off from Southampton – the Titanic hit a massive iceberg. The ship was far out to sea, nearly 400 miles from the coast of Newfoundland. And the collision dented the hull, allowing water to flood between the buckled steel plates into five of the vessel’s watertight compartments.

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Image: Ann Ronan Pictures/Print Collector/Getty Images
Image: Ann Ronan Pictures/Print Collector/Getty Images

Since the Titanic had been designed to survive up to four, rather than five, of its compartments being flooded, the vessel’s fate was now inevitable. The great ship’s bow started to dip into the icy Atlantic waters. And less than three hours after the collision with the iceberg, the vessel began to split in two. The ocean liner then sank entirely beneath the waves.

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