30 Years After This Photographer’s Death, A Hidden Box Of Early Gender-Bending Experiments Was Found

ADVERTISEMENT
Image: Preus Museum

On a farm somewhere in Norway, two elderly women spend the last days of their eventful lives. And 30 years after their death, a visitor discovers a mysterious box in a barn. Labeled “Private,” the box contains some incredible images that shed new light on a photographic team who were way ahead of their time.

Image: Preus Museum

Marie Høeg was born in Langesund, Norway, on April 15, 1866. As a young woman, she studied photography and finished her apprenticeship in 1890. The newly qualified photographer then traveled to Finland where she found work taking photos in various towns. And while there, she met a woman with whom she would forge a lifelong bond.  

ADVERTISEMENT

Image: Preus Museum

Bolette Berg was five years Høeg’s junior, and she shared her passion for photography. Back in the 1890s, it was one of the few professions that women were free to pursue. And because many thought that operating a camera required a certain artistic talent, it was also deemed a respectable activity for young females like Høeg and Berg.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT