30 Years After This Photographer’s Death, A Hidden Box Of Early Gender-Bending Experiments Was Found

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Image: Preus Museum

In 1895, the two women left Finland for Horten, a town in the south of Norway. There, they set up their own studio under the name Berg & Høeg. And over time, the pair built up a reputation as photographers, snapping portraits as well as scenic pictures of Horten and the nearby area.

Image: Preus Museum

In fact, Høeg and Berg were able to make a good living from flogging their photographs. But for Høeg, the business wasn’t just about pursuing her own independent career. She was also a vocal proponent of women’s rights, and often used their studio to host meetings for feminist activists.

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Image: Preus Museum

With the Norwegian Navy’s main shipyard located close by, business in Horten was booming. In fact, Høeg and Borg ran their studio successfully for eight years. Then in 1903, they moved to Kristiania, the city that would later become the Norwegian capital of Oslo.

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