A Man Took A Pee In The Mountains – Then Stumbled Upon A 49,000-Year-Old Archaeological Wonder

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Image: Bernard DUPONT

The mountains are home to a varied selection of wildlife including red and western grey kangaroos, yellow-footed rock-wallabies and large number of bird and reptile species. Other exotic Australian creatures to be found there include marsupials such as the planigale and the dunnart, pictured here.

Image: NASA

Europeans first encountered the Flinders Ranges in 1802. That was when members of an exploratory team led by Englishman Captain Matthew Flinders scaled the peak of Mount Brown. Further exploration and the opening of sheep farms continued through the 19th century. Other commercial activities in the Flinders Ranges included copper and coal mining.

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Image: Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images

But the original human inhabitants of the Flinders Ranges, the Adnyamathanha people, have been there for many millennia longer than the late-arriving Europeans. Formerly, it was believed that their predecessors had occupied the land for around 39,000 years. But the cave that Coulthard and Hamm found in 2011 challenged that assumption.

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