How Swine Flu Has Changed the Faces of the Earth

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Churchgoers in MexicoPhoto:
Image: Eneas de Troya

The first cases of novel influenza A (H1N1), commonly called swine flu because of its swine origin, were detected in April 2009. Because the virus is spread similar in a similar way to regular seasonal influenza through the coughs and sneezes of infected people, swine flu has changed the face of the Earth. Here are ten images that will show you how.

As with any new virus strain, many questions about H1N1 are still open, for example how exactly it spreads and how to vaccinate and protect against it. For the time being, health authorities have issued common-sense guidelines to reduce the spread of the virus that include washing hands frequently, covering one’s mouth when sneezing or coughing, and staying at home when sick.

Though information on the effectiveness of facemasks for the control of influenza is currently still extremely limited, this does not deter people from wearing facemasks when out in public places. Facemasks are everywhere as the following pictures show and have changed the way we lead our lives.

In the subway
Subway riders in Mexico CityPhoto:
Image: Eneas de Troya

In the rain
Woman with colourful umbrellaPhoto:
Image: Guerry Monero

In the playground
Children playingPhoto:
Image: Sarihuella

In every situation
Mexican policemenPhoto:
Image: Sarihuella

In nomine patris
ProcessionPhoto:
Image: Eneas de Troya

In church
Churchgoers in MexicoPhoto:
Image: Eneas de Troya

In style
Mexican youthsPhoto:
Image: Sarihuella

In public
Woman with facemaskPhoto:
Image: Guerry Monero

In childhood
Woman with daughterPhoto:
Image via English Eastday

In hospital gear
Woman with protective gearPhoto:
Image: iyasser

Source: 1

We’ll even throw in a free album.

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