Scientists Have Made A Breakthrough In The Mystery Of Why The People Of Easter Island Disappeared

ADVERTISEMENT
Image: voltamax
Image: voltamax

The statues do, though, seem to provide evidence of a complex civilization. And yet when European explorers first set foot on the piece of land, they came across a relatively small population estimated to number no more than 3,000. The explorers, then, were puzzled. Surely the civilization that made these statues had to have been much larger?

Image: via The Famous People
Image: via The Famous People

The first expedition to reach Easter Island was led by Dutch explorer Jacob Roggeveen, and it made land on Easter Day in 1722. Roggeveen had been searching for new trade routes, and alongside Easter Island he also came across Samoa and other Pacific lands.

ADVERTISEMENT

Image: Phirosiberia
Image: Phirosiberia

This came at a time when the Dutch were looking to dominate the world stage. The Age of Discovery had begun in 1492 with Christopher Columbus’ first voyage. And with the expeditions bankrolled by the Spanish, all the wealth of the new discoveries had made Spain a powerful empire. By the 18th century, though, the British and Dutch had also grown hungry for power and money. Consequently, they too had undertaken their own explorations.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT