He Was Washington’s Most Sought-After Young Reporter. Then People Looked Closer At His Sources

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Image: Vimeo/Larry Knight
Image: Vimeo/Larry Knight

In retrospect, his sweetness and modesty may not have been all they seemed. But in an industry crowded with overbearing egos, his self-effacing attitude made a refreshing change. In fact, Glass was apparently so vulnerable and eager to please, he could never really say “no.” And this endeared him to his colleagues.

Image: Jim Pennucci
Image: Jim Pennucci

Creatively, Glass’s breakthrough came in 1996 when the magazine’s owner, Martin Peretz, suggested he write a piece about how types of immigrants were taking the jobs of African-American taxi drivers in Washington. Glass spent months on the piece but the final copy impressed. “People were in wonderment about his ability to find these crazy characters,” said a former colleague to Vanity Fair.

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Image: AgnosticPreachersKid
Image: AgnosticPreachersKid

Later that year, Glass submitted a scathing piece about the Center for Science in Public Interest. Controversially, he depicted a reactionary and frivolous organization led by one haughty and scheming Michael Jacobson. In one scene, Jacobson fanatically interrogates a waitress in a Chinese restaurant concerning their ingredients. Michael Kelly, the new editor of The New Republic, loved it.

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