U.S. President John Tyler Was Born Back In 1790 – But Two Of His Grandsons Are Alive To This Day

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Image: via Wikimedia Commons

Tyler subsequently started a law practice in the Virginian capital, Richmond, before he subsequently launched his political career. In 1811, then, Tyler won a seat in the Virginia House of Delegates, Charles City County. The young politician was just 21 at the time of his election success, and his early career was defined by two main political positions: a robust belief in the independent rights of states and hostility to any notion of a national bank.

Image: Eyre Crowe

In 1816 Tyler then achieved election to the U.S. Congress. However, he found his time in office somewhat dissatisfactory, and he left Congress in 1820. You see, the most contentious political issues of the day included slavery, and Tyler had inherited 13 slaves when his father died in 1813. Hence, Tyler voted against any bills that sought to control slavery – but the movement towards the abolition of the practice was on the rise, and the Virginian politician felt powerless to stop it.

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Image: Rembrandt Peale

Tyler’s next move, then, was to return to Virginia state politics. In 1823 he once again represented Charles City County in Virginia’s House of Delegates, before he then became the state’s Governor in 1825. This position was largely ceremonial, though, and Tyler’s governorship is most remembered for his funeral address for Thomas Jefferson, who died in 1826.

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