This Eerie Graveyard Of 1940s Streetcars Is Slowly Being Reclaimed By Nature

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Image: Forsaken Fotos / Forsaken Fotos

Just outside a forgotten mining town in a remote forest in rural Pennsylvania, a fleet of vintage streetcars lie decaying in the undergrowth. Abandoned on a dead-end stretch of rusty railroad, these forlorn urban relics evoke nostalgia for another time and place. But how did they end up here? Who brought them? And why?

Image: Forsaken Fotos

The town’s name is Windber. It was founded in Somerset County in the late 19th century by two brothers – the coal magnates Charles and Edward Julius Berwind. At its peak in the ’40s, Windber was home to around 9,000 inhabitants, and they worked in a number of industrial operations, including lumbering and brick manufacturing.

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Image: Forsaken Fotos

However, from the 1950s onwards, the coal mines began to close and the town’s population started to dwindle; indeed, by 2015 it was less than 4,000. Today, Windber is no longer a hub of industry, and the old railroad tracks that once connected it to the outside world have fallen into disuse and dilapidation.

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