Lights Out for WWF’s Earth Hour

WWF's Earth HourPhoto: WWF

On Saturday, 26th March 2011, the global skyline will be plunged into darkness for the world’s biggest call for action on the threats facing our planet.

From London to Sydney, Toronto and Singapore, people all across the world will switch off their lights for WWF’s Earth Hour 2011 to show they care about tackling climate change and protecting the natural world. It’s a reminder to us all that we only have one planet Earth and need to look after it.

WWF Earth HourPhoto: WWF

We need energy for everything – to get to work, to stay warm, cook dinner, watch TV… the list goes on. But the way we use energy and the way it’s produced has impacts on the environment – particularly contributing to climate change through carbon emissions. Climate change is the biggest threat to our planet right now but the good news is we can all do something about it.

Simply register for WWF’s Earth Hour and switch off on the night to take part and show you care. By signing up, you will call on the government for action to ‘clean up’ our energy supply and reduce the impact it has on our planet.

What you do to celebrate WWF’s Earth Hour is completely up to you. Already people around the world are organising Earth Hour events, from candlelit dinner parties and ‘wear it bright’ days at work to dancing flash mobs to lantern making workshops – it’s not about just sitting in the dark for an hour, it’s about having fun and making 26 March a night to remember!

WWF Earth HourPhoto: WWF

Iconic landmarks across the UK will be switching off including Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament,the BT Tower, National Gallery, Wembley Stadium, Old Trafford, Clifton Suspension Bridge, Edinburgh Castle, Stormont, Millennium Centre and the Piccadilly lights.

They’ll be joining international landmarks across an estimated 128 countries and 4,000 cities – a powerful message to world leaders of the need for urgent action on climate change and a compelling reminder that we only have one planet.

WWF's Earth HourPhoto: WWF

One question you may ask yourself more than any other in the run up to Earth Hour is – faced with the massive issue of climate change, does switching off my light really matter? The answer is both yes and no. The world now uses so much energy that even the hundreds of millions of people who turn off their lights for Earth Hour won’t make a great difference to energy consumption. Switching off for Earth Hour is a symbolic gesture to highlight how we need to clean up our whole energy system and stop wasting energy through poorly insulated homes.

To do something massive and global, like tackling climate change, we need inspiration, we need new ways of thinking, we need to feel like a big global community whilst doing positive things locally. And that’s what WWF’s Earth Hour is all about. Last year whilst the lights went out, the world’s social media lit up with stories of landmarks plunged into darkness, street parties, candlelit walks, acoustic gigs and quiet nights in with friends.

Hundreds of millions of people stopped doing what they normally did and saw things in a different light. They sent a powerful message to world leaders that they want to tackle climate change and just as importantly, an inspiring message to each other that we’re all in this together.

You can be a part of something momentous and help make this year’s Earth Hour bigger and better than ever. Join in the World’s biggest display of climate change action by registering at wwf.org.uk/earth_hour

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