The Heat is on Steorn’s Orbo

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Last year, Steorn, an Irish technology company made the claim that they developed a free energy technology. In August of 2006, Steorn placed an ad in the Economist to attract the world’s leading scientists to try and disprove their technology. Several thousand scientists stepped up to the plate, yet only 22 scientists were chosen to prove its claims wrong.

Steorn’s Orbo technology is based on magnetic fields which supposedly produces clean and free energy. It is also supposed to be completely scalable and could be used to power anything from cell phones to cars.

Yesterday Steorn issued a Press Release announcing to the world that it was ready for a public demonstration in London. There were to be four live web cams to stream at four different angles live across the web for everyone to see.

Sean McCarthy, CEO of Steorn, commented:

We’ve decided to demonstrate our Orbo technology in a global and public forum to raise greater awareness amongst the product development community. We want to give equal access to developers so they can use this technology to power products that will bring benefits to everyone. Ultimately, it’s also a reminder to the world that this free energy technology is being validated and will definitely happen.

Last night at the first planned live viewing at 11pm, the supposed free and clean energy machine failed to work. Engineers said the cause seems to be the intense heat from the spot lights that may have affected the air bearings, and assured that it was not the technology itself.

Free energy from a perpetual motion device could help bring about the drastic reduction in carbon emissions needed to halt global warming. However, many scientists and engineers that just refuse to believe that such a device is even possible. We can only hope that Steorn can fix the problem on the Orbo device and deliver what they promise.

This post has been sent to us by new contributor JT. If you feel like writing for us, drop us an email!

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