The Myths and Marvels of Lake Titicaca

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Image: lillirod

A traditional reed boat floating on Lake Titicaca

Myths, legends and mystery – Lake Titicaca, which sits on the border of Bolivia and Peru, has it all. For many South American cultures, this lake is considered a sacred site and the location of legendary figures. With its serene beauty and peacefulness, Lake Titicaca is also a major tourist destination – but how can this fascinating place combine tradition and commerce? Read on and see for yourself.


Image: lillirod

The vast blue expanse of Lake Titicaca

At an elevation of 12,500 feet (3,811 m), Titicaca, in the Andes, is the highest navigable lake on Earth. This landlocked body of water is shared by two countries, with Peru claiming its western part, and Bolivia its eastern section.

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Image: Istvan Kadar

Women congregate beside their wonderful reed constructions.

As if being the highest lake in the world that’s able to be navigated weren’t enough of a record, Lake Titicaca is also the largest lake in South America, at least by water volume. Though Venezuela’s Lake Maracaibo has a larger surface area, it is also connected to the Caribbean Sea via the Gulf of Venezuela and is therefore technically a bay rather than a lake.

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