A Deaf Woman Fell 700 Feet While Hiking, But When Help Arrived She Wasn’t Alone

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Image: Facebook/CBC North / ABC News

When Amelia Milling set off on a solo hike in Alaska, she probably never expected to face the emergency situation in which she was to find herself. The trekking student slipped – then plunged down the side of an icy Alaskan mountain, and she thought she was all alone. By the time rescuers arrived, though, she wasn’t alone at all.

Image: Facebook/Amelia Milling

Milling hails from Chattanooga, Tennessee, but lives in Rochester, New York, where she reads visual media at the city’s Institute of Technology. And by the time her summer break rolled around in June 2018, the 21-year-old student – who is hearing-impaired – had the perfect getaway planned.

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Image: Instagram/sturgegram

She would travel all the way to Alaska to trek along Crow Pass – a 23-mile pathway that used to be part of the historic Iditarod Trail used by Alaskan natives and pioneers. And although the route is not regarded as the most arduous of its kind – at least after the first three uphill miles – there are, nonetheless, some ever-present dangers.

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