Knox’s Wireless Green

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Knox’s Wireless Green is a rundown of all the week’s most interesting, weird, and popular stories from the worlds of science and the environment.

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We’ll start today’s journey in New York City with a story from our friends over at Celsias. In a prime example of governments being stupid (as if you needed another one) Eddie House was sued for cancelling his waste collection service after he reduced his household waste to nearly nothing by recycling. The lawsuit, filed by waste collection service Allied Waste, said that House had broken a city law requiring all property to have Allied pick up their waste at least once a week. Eddie must be made of stronger stuff than me. Even if I was recycling everything, I’d be way too afraid of who might be the real power behind Allied Waste to take them on. I don’t want some Tony Soprano wannabe breaking my legs because I recycle too much.

It’s also been a banner week for fans of electric cars. There’ve been not one but two stories of people building their own DIY electric cars from earth friendly gearhead site Ecomodder. A 16 year old kid, Andrew Angellotti, put $6,000 he had earned as a lifeguard towards converting his 1988 Mazda pickup into electric. The truck can reach 55 mph and can get about 40 miles on a charge. But a pair of Canadian’s built another electric car for almost 1/10 of what Angellotti spent. Darin Cosgrove and Ivan Limburg converted a car into a full electric vehicle for only $672, most of which was spent on a used forklift that provided most of the parts. The bad news is the car was a Geo Metro. The good news is its 40 mph top speed isn’t that much less than a gas powered Geo Metro.

And on the global warming front, there’s been loads of semi-positive news. For one thing, if global warming keeps going like it does there may be less hurricanes! So now all we’ll have to worry about is drought, rising sea levels, and wars over scarce resources. And for those of you who want to help the environment but just can’t remember to turn your computer off, there’s some good news. While you’ll still be releasing 1,500 pounds of CO2 into the atmosphere every year, you can at least put your computer to good use when you leave it on. The Nature Conservancy reported on a network run by Oxford University that uses computers that are left on, but not being used, to run climate change models. If, after joining the network, you leave your computer on but aren’t really using it, a climate change model will run in the background. This lets scientists learn more about global warming and lets you put your computer to good use if you’re too lazy to turn it off when you’re not using it.

If you want to keep up with Wireless Green, why not subcribe to our RSS feed? We’ll even throw in a free album.

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