70 Years After This Woman Vanished, New Evidence Challenged Her Husband’s Conviction For Her Death

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Image: via Wikimedia Commons / Image: via Medium

It was late winter in 1930s Albury, New South Wales, Australia, and local farmer Tom Griffith was walking the outskirts of the city. Suddenly, the Australian spotted something sinister and sickening in a tunnel running under the road. It was a dead female body – clad in exotic sleepwear and burnt almost beyond recognition. The anonymous corpse became known by the public as the Pyjama Girl due to its atypical apparel. Years later, the dead woman is finally identified through forensic methods, and her husband is subsequently found guilty of murder. But was there more to the Pyjama Girl case then met the eye?

Image: John L. Stoddard

Florence Linda Platt was born on September 12, 1905, in Forest Hill, a district in south-east London, England. After school, the petite teenager took up a job just south of the city, at a confectionary store in Surrey. If reports are correct she met a sweetheart there and fell in love. But when the relationship went bad, the heartbroken girl is thought to have emigrated halfway around the world in dismay.

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Image: Fox Photos/Getty Images

Going by her middle name of Linda, the now 19-year-old fetched up in New Zealand and remained there for three years before relocating to Sydney, Australia. Once in the capital of New South Wales, Linda found work in a picture theater and took a room at a boarding house in the city’s Kings Cross. As it turned out, this bohemian area with its transient air and dens of ill repute suited the flighty young woman just fine.

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