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Image: theangloscot

What would you do if you were scuba diving and unexpectedly faced a huge whale or whale shark? Would you have the guts to try and find out which species you are face to fin with, or would you thank your stars the gigantic creature hadn’t seen you and swim away as long as you still could? Would you coolly get out your camera and click a few snaps? Or tell your camera man to do so, with you as bait? Well, we found some people who did just that…


Image: treehugger

Would you mess with a 40-tonne humpback whale?

In this image, not only does the diver seem dangerously close to a 40-tonne humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae), this one’s also a female whose calf is not far behind. And speaking of gigantic proportions: Mara, here pictured in December 2007, was on a journey from Polynesia, where her calf Kell was born, to Antarctica, making her annual summer migration to feeding grounds thousands of miles away.

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Image: whalewatchvavau

A diver eye-to-eye with a calf, the mother vertically in the water below.

This diver in Vava’u, Tonga got lucky filming an inquisitive humpback whale baby. Humpback whale calves weigh one to two tons when born and are around 1.5 m long. For them to gain about 100 lbs a day, the mother has to express about 100 liters of her rich, fatty milk daily.

Whales do seem to eat up nautical miles like airplanes do sky miles. Humpback whales for example travel some 25,000 km each year when migrating! They can be found in all of the world’s oceans and do come quite close to the shore in some instances.

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