This Is The Truth Behind Why The Roy Rogers Museum Finally Shut Its Doors For Good

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Image: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Roy Rogers was known as “King of the Cowboys,” and he has gone down in history as an icon of his era. But the museum dedicated to the star was, unfortunately, less popular in the end. Once upon a time, the Roy Rogers Museum in Victorville pulled in over 200,000 visitors a year – yet now it’s gone for good. So, what happened?

Image: Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Roy Rogers was born with the given name Leonard Slye in 1911 – just before the Great Depression took hold. As a youngster, the future star learned to ride on the family horse and was taught square dancing and yodeling. And these skills would serve him well when he was discovered by the entertainment industry.

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Image: Hulton Archive/Getty Images

At 19 years of age, on the advice of his sister Mary, Rogers did a tryout with the Midnight Frolic radio show. At the time, he was a shy young man – yet he was nonetheless able to perform. And as a result, he got into a country music group called the Rocky Mountaineers. Bob Nolan and Tim Spencer were also Rocky Mountaineers at the start of their careers.

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