When Fear And Loathing’s Dr. Gonzo Disappeared In 1974, Hunter S. Thompson Suspected Foul Play

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For his part, Hunter S. Thompson is the more famous of the Thompson-Acosta duo. He’s known as the father of “gonzo journalism” and an icon of the countercultural movement. As well as penning books, he also wrote for many publications. And most notable of these was Rolling Stone, where he worked for 30 years.

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Meanwhile, Thompson met Acosta in 1967 in Colorado, heralding the beginning of an odd relationship between the two men. Indeed, the latter detailed their first meeting in his 1972 book Autobiography of a Brown Buffalo. In it, Thompson had the pseudonym “King” and Acosta described him as “tall and on the verge of losing his hair.”

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Image: Facebook/Hunter S. Thompson

Thompson and Acosta then became friends – and in 1971 the former wrote an article about the attorney and his activism work for Rolling Stone. Specifically, he wanted to bring to attention the death of Los Angeles Times journalist Rubén Salazar. For its part, the article was titled “Strange Rumblings in Aztlan.”

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