Something Crazy Just Happened In The Sahara For The First Time In Decades – And People Were Stunned

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Image: Facebook/Karim Bouchetata
Image: Facebook/Karim Bouchetata

Behold the Sahara. At 3,500,000 square miles, it’s the largest hot desert in the world. In its hottest month, its searing temperatures will average up to 104° F. That’s the highest recorded average in the world. And at its most fierce, the mercury once rose to an average high of 116.6° F, a world record. On super-rare occasions, however, the mercury can plummet – and when it does, the strangest thing happens.

Image: Facebook/Karim Bouchetata
Image: Facebook/Karim Bouchetata

Indeed, just before Christmas 2016 the unthinkable happened. In fact, it was the first time this phenomenon had been seen in 37 years. Not quite a once-in-a-lifetime experience, perhaps, but rare enough for photographer Karim Bouchetata – who lives there – to snatch his camera and document what was going on.

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Image: Facebook/Karim Bouchetata
Image: Facebook/Karim Bouchetata

Bouchetata lives in Ain Sefra, an Algerian town some 3,300 feet above sea level that’s sandwiched between the Sahara and the Atlas Mountains. And he knew that his pictures were going to be remarkable.

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