A Burmese Miner Just Found A Prehistoric Relic So Unique And Beautiful That Scientists Are Stunned

ADVERTISEMENT

Image: via NPR / via Current Biology
Images: Lida Xing via NPR / via Current Biology

The mines of northern Myanmar – also known as Burma – have been producing amber for thousands of years. What one miner found encased in a piece of rock in 2015, however, was truly unique. In fact, to the surprise of international scientists, he had unearthed the remains of a never-before-documented prehistoric creature.

Image: Brocken Inaglory
Image: Brocken Inaglor

Made of tree resin which has hardened over time, amber is a semi-precious gemstone that has long been used in jewelry. And, as anyone who has seen Jurassic Park knows, it can sometimes contain fossilized prehistoric insects such as mosquitos. What this piece of Burmese amber contained, however, was even more amazing than that.

ADVERTISEMENT

Image: Anders L. Dangaard
Image: Anders L. Dangaard

Also known as “burmite,” Burmese amber was formed in the Cretaceous era. Starting 145 million years ago, the epoch lasted some 79 million years and saw the evolution of a wide variety of species. However, it ended with a violent extinction event that wiped out three quarters of the Earth’s species.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT