10 Most Incredible Volcanic Eruptions Seen from Space

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Image: NASA

Here’s a close-up of the thick plume of volcanic ash that traveled 6.2 miles (10 km) up into the air and drifted around the globe after the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle eruption, causing airports as far away as Buenos Aires and Melbourne to close. More devastating, however, were the consequences for the surrounding environment: the temperature of the nearby Nilahue River rose to 45 °C (113 °F), killing about 4.5 million fish; and, after five years of drought suffered by two provinces in Argentina, the remaining usable farmland was destroyed, endangering 750,000 sheep and 60,000 cattle.


Image: NASA

9. Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, 2010

Many people remember the eruption of the Icelandic volcano with the unpronounceable name that affected the schedules of so many flights – and the travel plans of hundreds of thousands of travelers – in northwestern Europe in 2010. Here we can see the large ash plume spreading out over the North Atlantic on April 17, a plume that rose 5.6 miles (9 km) into the air.

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Image: NASA

On May 13, 2010, the area surrounding Eyjafjallajökull appeared to be covered by a blanket of smoke, ash and clouds, as this dramatic image shows. It’s hard to believe that a week-and-a-half later, the situation – which caused the highest level of disruption to air travel since World War Two – had calmed down considerably. By May 24, Eyjafjallajökull was emitting only steam and sulfurous gases and appeared to be dormant. At least for the time being.

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