There Are Mysterious Objects As Tall As Skyscrapers On Pluto – And Now Scientists Know Why

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Image: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

Madan then told his friend Herbert Hall Turner, an Oxford University astronomy professor, about the proposed name. Turner in turn telegrammed the suggestion to the Lowell Observatory – and promptly forgot all about it. Then, on May 1, it was announced that the new planet’s name was to be just as Venetia had suggested: Pluto. Venetia’s reward was a five-pound note from her grandfather; and this was a huge amount of money for a child in the 1930s.

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Image: NASA/APL/SwRI via Getty Images

So, the planet Pluto, the furthest in our solar system from the Sun, had now been discovered and named, and that was how things remained for the next few decades. But then, from 1992, doubts about Pluto’s status as a planet began to emerge.

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