After Two WWII Planes Collided In Mid-Air, The Pilots’ Aerial Exploits Were Astonishing

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Image: Facebook/Historical Aircrafts

It’s September 1940, the second year of WWII, and two Australian pilots are on a training exercise, each accompanied by his navigator. They’re both flying twin-engined Avro Anson aircraft on what should be an entirely routine flight over the Australian bush. But then catastrophe strikes in an entirely unpredictable way. Can the four crewmen come out of it alive?

Image: VirtualSteve

We’ll come back to the nature and outcome of that mid-air incident a little later, but for now let’s find out a bit more about what the young airmen were doing. All four were stationed at the Royal Australian Air Force’s Forest Hill Station. It’s still there today, but it’s now called the RAAF Wagga Base.

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Image: Bidgee

The air base’s new name is taken from the city of Wagga Wagga, about seven miles away. The town itself is in New South Wales on Australia’s east coast, about 235 miles south-west of the state capital, Sydney. While they were there, the four young men were attending flight training school.

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