This Giant Mass Of Rock Conceals An Awesome 1,500-Year-Old Stronghold That’s Still Inhabited Today

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Image: Andrew Raff/Flickr
Image: Andrew Raff/Flickr

From the mainland, the island appears to be little more than a hulking mass of rock, barren but for a thin cloak of wiry brush. However, hidden from view on its seaward side, and beyond a mysterious spiked door in a fortified wall, is an L-shaped tunnel that leads to an ancient town.

Image: Discover Peloponnese/Flickr
Image: Discover Peloponnese/Flickr

Once called a “ship of stone” by the popular Greek poet Yiannis Ritsos, the island is located in the Aegean Sea off the southeast coast of the Peloponnese – a large, four-fingered peninsula in southern Greece. And though it may appear to be lifeless, this island has actually been continuously inhabited for around 1,500 years.

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Image: Pierre-Alain Maire/Flickr
Image: Pierre-Alain Maire/Flickr

Formerly part of the mainland, the island was forged by an earthquake in 375 A.D. With a rocky, table-top plateau at its peak, its sheer walls climb to a height of around 330 feet, offering a commanding vantage point. Its width is just under 1,000 feet wide, while its length is around 3,300 feet.

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