Name That Scene: Classic Movie Moments Lovingly Recreated in LEGO

In 2014 The LEGO Movie finally saw the cherished children’s toy officially make its debut in a full-length theatrical film. However, for decades amateur filmmakers have been creating unauthorized animated features, dubbed “Brickfilms,” out of real LEGO bricks – rather than the CGI effects often used to represent them in The LEGO Movie.

One such LEGO-loving moviemaker is Morgspenny Productions’ Morgan Spence, who was commissioned to recreate famous silver-screen scenarios in LEGO for Warren Elsome’s 2014 book, Brick Flicks: 60 Iconic Movie Scenes and Posters to Make From LEGO. Here, for example, Spence has lovingly re-imagined a scene from 1939’s unforgettable The Wizard of Oz, right down to the movie’s legendary yellow brick road.

14. The Sound of Music (1965)

The Sound of Music and its eponymous song really do come alive in this LEGO take on the 1965 classic. The recreation boasts the gorgeous rolling hills dotted with colorful flowers that set the stage for Julie Andrews’ Maria, and the LEGO character’s costume even matches the one worn by Andrews in the renowned “the hills are alive” scene.

13. Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)

It’s all there: the long cigarette holder, the iconic little black dress and the – rather large – croissant on the table. Given that he’s 15 years old, Spence could never have seen Breakfast at Tiffany’s upon its release in 1961; however, that hasn’t stopped him from brilliantly recreating Audrey Hepburn’s free-spirited character Holly Golightly and her surroundings in one of the movie’s classic images.

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12. The Wizard of Oz (1939)

This close-up shows Dorothy, the Cowardly Lion, the Scarecrow and the Tin Man walking the Yellow Brick Road on their way to find the Wizard of Oz. Those bright red flowers in the background perhaps bring to mind the poppies laid by the Wicked Witch of the West as a trap for the foursome. Fortunately, though, in this shot they appear to be happily on their way to the Emerald City.

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11. Life of Pi (2012)

Spence utilizes stop-motion animation for his mini-movies, something which involves piecing together numerous separate stills. It takes 15 images to produce a single animated second – an impressive feat by anybody’s standards. Here, Spence has captured in LEGO the watery ordeal experienced by Pi Patel, shipwrecked in the middle of the Pacific Ocean in 2012’s Life of Pi.

However, Pi isn’t alone during his time at sea, sharing as he does his lifeboat with an unpredictable, intimidating Bengal tiger called Richard Parker. This image showcases a LEGO doppelgänger of Richard Parker with a rather forlorn expression – perhaps understandable given the somewhat hopeless circumstances of the pair in the movie.

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10. Dirty Dancing (1987)

Spence also recreated one of the most pivotal scenes from 1987 classic Dirty Dancing. In the movie, Johnny, played by the late Patrick Swayze, has to teach Baby, portrayed by Jennifer Grey, how to hold a lift for an important dance routine. The water-based moment when Baby takes on the maneuver is here flawlessly realized in LEGO form.

9. Dr. No (1962)

Dr. No, the inaugural James Bond film, was released back in 1962 with Sean Connery as the iconic British secret agent. In this image, a LEGO version of Bond sits, gun close by, on the titular villain’s Crab Key island.

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Any LEGO recreation of Dr. No wouldn’t be complete without the iconic scene where bikini-clad Bond girl Honey Ryder, played in the film by Ursula Andress, walks out of the ocean and on to the Crab Key shore. The setting’s details are accurate, right down to the seashell that Ryder carries – though the LEGO shell is, admittedly, quite large in scale compared to the figure of Ryder herself.

8. Dracula (1931)

In 1931 audiences sunk their teeth into the movie adaptation of Bram Stoker’s Dracula, featuring Bela Lugosi as the fearsome Count. Spence’s LEGO adaptation presents a version of the vampire that is tiny in scale but nevertheless startlingly similar to its big-screen counterpart.

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7. E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982)

It’s among the best-known and most-loved scenes in movie history: E.T. and Elliott, the latter played by Henry Thomas, soaring over a forest and past the moon in Steven Spielberg’s 1982 classic E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. It’s also a moment that’s been affectionately reconstructed by Spence, right down to the trees in the background and foreground.

6. Pulp Fiction (1994)

In Quentin Tarantino’s 1994 cult classic, Pulp Fiction, John Travolta as Vincent Vega and Uma Thurman’s Mia Wallace take to the floor for a ‘50s-themed restaurant’s twist competition. The electrifying dance sequence is definitely brought to mind by the characters’ LEGO counterparts in the scene pictured, with the pair also seemingly entertaining the LEGO audience in the background.

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5. Singin’ in the Rain (1952)

After he kisses his lady goodnight, Gene Kelly’s character Don Lockwood launches into the charming title song during a downpour in 1952 movie Singin’ in the Rain. The LEGO figurine that Spence uses seems to perfectly capture Lockwood’s carefree attitude as he closes his umbrella and goes on to perform that celebrated song-and-dance routine.

Spence’s LEGO scene faithfully recreates perhaps the most well-known part of Lockwood’s dance as he hops up on, and moves around, a soaking wet lamppost. The film – co-directed by Kelly and Stanley Donen – tells the story of a silent movie company getting to grips with producing features with sound.

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4. Titanic (1997)

In 1997 drama Titanic, Leonardo DiCaprio’s character Jack and Kate Winslet’s Rose fall in love on the doomed passenger liner. Here, the blockbuster’s arguably most iconic scene is recreated, with a LEGO version of Jack helping a similarly plastic Rose balance on the ship’s railing in front of the setting sun.

3. Wayne’s World (1992)

In 1992 the movie-going public was introduced to Wayne Campbell (Mike Myers) and Garth Algar (Dana Carvey), the two music-loving slackers who feature in Wayne’s World. This LEGO recreation sees the duo, accompanied by a couple of friends, captured in the car that hosts perhaps the movie’s most enduring scene – that famous rock-out to Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody.”

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2. Laurel and Hardy Films (1927-1951)

Comedy duo Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy lit up the silver screen between 1927 and 1951, making audiences laugh with each and every production that they released. Yet while the pair did appear on screen together in 1921’s The Lucky Dog, their beloved double act began in earnest with 1927’s Putting Pants on Philip, a tale about taking a kilt-wearing Scotsman to a tailor.

The actors starred in more than 100 productions together, including shorts and features – and a good number of these featured a Model T Ford car, as depicted in this LEGO version of a Laurel and Hardy scene. However, while Spence’s dedication to detail is impressive, in this image it appears as if both LEGO characters have more or less the same build. By contrast, in real life Hardy was famously considerably larger than Laurel during the double act’s time in the spotlight.

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1. The Shining (1980)

In 1980 horror The Shining, the haunted Overlook Hotel gradually sends Jack Torrance, played by Jack Nicholson, somewhat off the rails. And this LEGO-recreated scene shows just how off the rails he truly goes, capturing the point in the movie where Torrance puts an axe through a bathroom door while in search of his family. Behind the door, meanwhile, Jack’s wife Wendy, portrayed on film by Shelley Duvall, cowers with a knife.

This LEGO figure looks remarkably similar to Nicholson’s character during that scene, right down to his terrifying facial expression. In fact, it wouldn’t be too much of a stretch to imagine it saying those iconic words, “Here’s Johnny!”

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