These Photographs of Animals Licking Windows are Freaking Hilarious

Image: via SwordfishGirl

Most likely it’s the sweet, cool condensation. But regardless of what these animals are after, the photographic results are hilarious and probably unique to human-animal interaction. After all, you wouldn’t catch these otters licking glass in the wild, would you? And, besides, who knew this was such a cross-species behavior?

Of course, of all the window-licking animals we’ve seen, dogs are the experts in this sport. Just look at the surface area this boxer dog’s tongue can cover in one fell ssslurrp. Mind you, it’s not surprising when you learn that an individual of this breed holds the Guinness World Record for longest dog tongue. How big was it? A whopping 17 inches.

Image: via reddit

On the other hand, hamsters are often seemingly so busy stuffing their cheek pouches full of food that we don’t get the chance to see their tongues. But while their cheek pouches keeps the stashed food fresh and dry, that’s not the case for their tongue. As proven by this little fuzzy fellow.

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Image: via Amazing Creatures

But maybe it’s the taste of the windows that these animals love so much? After all, these days household window sprays come in a variety of fragrances from grapefruit to cucumber. Whatever it is, this husky can’t get enough of it.

Image: via Attack of the Cute

“It’s mine, I say! All mine!” And that’s just one of the options for the thoughts going through this kitty’s head. Yep, this is one baaaad kitty.

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Image: via Attack of the Cute

Wherever North American red squirrels such as this may roam, they tend to feed on seeds, berries and shoots. But windows don’t taste like any of those things – this squirrel is obviously nuts.

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Being naturally curious creatures, cats love to sit on windowsills. After all, it’s a great vantage point from which to tease the neighborhood dogs. From this angle, though, you can really see the sandpaper-like texture of the cat’s tongue. Those scratchy spines in there? They are made of keratin – just like human hair.

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Perhaps this little fox is showing certain individuals just what it thinks of their opinions. After all, not everyone likes foxes, and many people hunt them amid claims that they are vermin.

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Image: via Metro

We’ve seen some pretty hammy performances in our time, with actors well and truly chewing the scenery. This gorilla puts them all to shame, though, with its dramatic arms and lolling tongue. The Oscar is all yours, buddy.

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Curiously, the red panda is one species that keeps scientists scratching their heads. For example, it has previously been classified in the bear family as well as the raccoon family. But now biologists claim that it belongs in its very own family. Confused yet? Bet you don’t look as baffled as this red panda cub.

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Image: Dale Carson

According to the American Kennel Club, the Labrador retriever has been the most popular dog breed in the United States for years. That’s understandable, as the dog makes for an ideal companion and is famed for its wonderful nature and trainability. Yet these handsome dogs are also renowned for their insatiable appetites. And it seems that windows are not excluded from this pooch’s menu list of favorites.

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Image: via Nature Calls

Curiously, the keepers at this zoo smeared some peanut butter onto the window as a treat for this baboon. Or maybe it’s torture. Either way, we have to wonder why they skimped on the grape jelly.

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Image: via Awesomely Cute

We’ve all heard of the Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, even if we haven’t seen the Tennessee Williams play. So what’s the plot of the Cat on a Wet Tile Roof? It’s a slippery discussion for sure.

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Mice tend not to go for glass as a tasty teatime treat, opting instead for grains and berries. But this little chap obviously didn’t get the memo.

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How cute is this rabbit? Bunnies are known for licking their owners as a sign of affection, so we can only assume that this little one just really, really, REALLY loves the window.

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Image: David Grant

Of course, gray squirrels are pretty common animals to see in gardens and parks, but it’s unusual to see them licking at windows with such gusto. Their tongues are pretty useful, though. Indeed, many of the squirrels’ vocalizations, such as clicks, squeaks and grunts, are made by snapping their tongues against their teeth.

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Image: via The Telegraph

While your pet cat will generally avoid jumping in water at all costs, tigers can swim up to 18 miles a day in their natural habitat. Still, this one seems to have gone for licking the glass enclosure for its water fix. Or maybe it’s trying to taste the humans gawping at it from the other side?

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Image: via Seventeen

Dogs will lick at windows when they’re anxious or bored, but some just like the feel of the glass. We imagine this last option is the case with this pug, as it’s splatted the full length of its tongue up against the window to get the most of that delicious glassy flavor.

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According to the Mammal Society in the United Kingdom, urban foxes are braving gardens more frequently to scavenge on rubbish, sniff around compost heaps… and lick windows, clearly. One explanation for this behavior may be that the animal was lapping at the window to get some much-needed moisture. Something otherwise missing, of course, from it’s British environment.

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Image: Reptile Forums/Ophexis

Though this species of crested gecko from New Caledonia is clearly not pictured in its native habitat, it’s incredible to think that it was thought to be extinct

Incredibly, this species of crested gecko from New Caledonia (though clearly not pictured in its native habitat here) was thought to be extinct until 1994, when a new population was discovered. Maybe they survived by window-licking their way into our hearts!

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