23 Years After A Father Mysteriously Vanished, His Family Received A Handwritten Letter In The Mail

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At home on Australia’s Sunshine Coast, Gabriel Nagy’s family receive a mysterious letter in the mail. Over two decades previously, they had lost a husband and father with no explanation when Nagy simply vanished without a trace. Now, though, the clan are about to discover the astonishing truth about what really happened all those years ago.

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Although Nagy’s story played out mostly in Australia, it actually began thousands of miles away in Germany. There, his parents met and fell in love in the aftermath of the Second World War. But prospects in the country were bleak, and soon the couple decided to seek their fortune elsewhere.

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When Nagy was just a young boy, then, his family relocated to Australia. Even after they settled in Sydney in New South Wales, however, life was far from easy. In fact, Nagy claims that he was often left to care for his ailing mother while his father regularly worked away from home. Eventually, though, he grew up and started a family of his own.

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In January 1987 Nagy – still living in Sydney – was now married to a woman named Pamela. And together the couple had two children: Stephen, who was then 11, and Jennifer, who was nine. The family apparently lived a comfortable life, too; they were supported by Nagy’s job as a shop fitter, while the man himself was also studying to become an accountant.

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But even though the children remember Nagy as a loving father, he often struggled to get by. “A few things took me off, I suppose, the straight and narrow,” he told Vision Christian Radio in an undated interview. “Not making correct decisions was one of them in that, I suppose, I got married too early, too quickly [and] not thinking the consequences through.” And so it seems that Nagy found himself overwhelmed by the challenges of family life.

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However, despite Nagy’s struggles, there was apparently little to indicate just how bad things were about to get. On January 21 the father of two telephoned Pamela and told her that he was on his way back to the family home. She was therefore expecting Nagy to arrive for lunch – but in the end, he never appeared.

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Then Pamela’s confusion turned to fear when her husband’s vehicle was found abandoned at the roadside the following day. Apparently, the car was now just a rusty shell. And for Nagy’s family, the discovery marked the start of a baffling mystery. “He’d never been away from home without telling anyone,” Jennifer said of her father in a 2012 interview with The Courier-Mail.

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Before long, in fact, Nagy’s disappearance prompted a full-blown missing-person investigation. “It was very soon after that everyone started rallying around and started putting out the big alarm bells,” Jennifer later recalled. Some two weeks after Nagy’s car was retrieved, however, there was a bizarre break in the case.

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Apparently, Nagy had visited a bank and withdrawn cash in Newcastle – a city some 100 miles to the north of Sydney. And there, the money had reportedly been used to purchase camping equipment. After that potential lead, though, the trail went cold. And for more than 20 years, Pamela and her children were therefore left to wonder what had happened to their missing loved one.

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Growing up, Jennifer had struggled to come to terms with the fact that her father had disappeared – along with the possibility that she may never know why he had gone. “It was just so traumatic for everyone,” she recalled. “It really affected me emotionally. People would ask, ‘Where’s your dad?’ It was too much – too painful.”

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“Nobody had any answers to explain the sudden disappearance of a dad who was a loving, caring father,” Jennifer continued. “I thought he was my world, and all of a sudden it’s taken away from me.” But as the years passed, she came no closer to understanding why her father had simply vanished without warning.

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Then, after some time, Pamela, Stephen and Jennifer left their home in Sydney and moved to the Sunshine Coast – some 500 miles away in Queensland. Ever hopeful, they ensured that their details were kept on record in case Nagy decided to return. But the family eventually came to believe that their husband and father must have passed away.

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Some 23 years after Nagy’s disappearance, though, a startling breakthrough occurred. For the past ten years, Senior Constable Georgia Robinson had been trying unsuccessfully to get to the bottom of the strange case. And now she was nearing the end of the line and preparing to have Nagy legally declared dead in just a couple of weeks’ time.

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However, as Robinson gathered information for the hearing at the coroner’s court, she decided to make one last attempt at tracking Nagy down. And this time, she struck gold. Apparently, you see, a man by the name of Gabriel Nagy had recently undergone surgery on his eye, and Australia’s health authority Medicare had documented the procedure.

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Soon, the medical records were traced to a man known as Ron Saunders, who had recently begun using the name Gabriel Nagy. And it seems that he was living in Mackay – a city on the east Queensland coast over 1,000 miles from where Pamela’s husband had disappeared. Before long, then, the police arrived at the mystery man’s door.

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Hoping to finally get to the bottom of the puzzle, officers handed Robinson’s contact details over to the individual who was calling himself Saunders. And a few days later, Saunders picked up the phone. “[Robinson] wanted to come up and talk with me,” he told The Courier-Mail in 2012. What’s more, he claimed that the last 20 years of his life had been a confusing blur.

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At the time, Saunders was living and working at Mackay’s River of Life church. He explained, however, that he had spent much of the past two decades homeless and wandering from place to place – with no real idea of where he had come from. “There was something in the back of my head there that I must have done something wrong to have been living the way I was,” he recalled.

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Intrigued, Saunders agreed to meet with Robinson. In turn she traveled to Mackay to confirm her suspicion that Gabriel Nagy had finally been found. And Robinson was quick to dispel the confused man’s fears. “The first thing she said when she arrived was, ‘You haven’t killed anybody. You’re not wanted by police. You’re a missing person, and that’s not a crime,’” Saunders explained.

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But were Saunders and Nagy really the same man? And if so, what had he been doing for the past 23 years? Apparently, Robinson began by showing Saunders pictures from Nagy’s life and asking him questions about his past. And soon, the memories that had been buried began to return.

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“It was like a cartoon where flashbulbs go off on top of people’s heads,” Saunders explained. “[Robinson] gave me a letter from Jennifer, a letter from Pam and letters from my dad and stepmom.” And together they managed to piece together the incredible story that had taken a father and husband so far from home. Yes, Saunders was indeed Gabriel Nagy.

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Apparently, one of the first things that Nagy can remember is being in Newcastle – where his credit card had been used – having sustained a serious head injury. According to some reports, he had been injured in a car accident at that time. But whatever the truth, Nagy suddenly found himself alone in a city – and with absolutely no recollection of his previous life.

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So, while Nagy’s family searched for him, the missing man by all accounts found himself homeless and with no clue about his real identity. “It was just a big blank in the back of my mind,” he told Vision Christian Radio. “And every time I tried to think about it, it just made me wonder, ‘[Am] I crazy? What happened to me?’ And then I’d think to myself, ‘What have I done to be in such a position?’”

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A confused Nagy also apparently began to suspect that he may have been a criminal in his previous life. “I’d just feel guilty and think, ‘Maybe I’ve committed murder or a bank robbery or something,’” he explained. “Then I’d occasionally jump inside a bottle, and that’d help me really forget stuff.”

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Jennifer thinks that Nagy may have fallen into what’s known as a dissociative – or fugue – state. This is a rare but traumatic neurological condition that can cause sufferers to forget their own identities. And it’s a disorder that can sometimes prompt individuals to travel, inadvertently leaving their old lives behind.

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Interestingly, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which is known as the DSM-5, describes the experience of falling into a fugue state as “bewildered wandering.” And it seems that this description matches the state in which Nagy has said that he found himself. In fact, the man claimed, he spent the following two decades living on the streets, relying on the occasional act of kindness to get by.

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Over the years, then, Nagy reportedly traveled steadily northwards from Newcastle, settling first in the city of Gladstone on the Queensland coast. Next, he apparently moved on to Rockhampton, where he found a temporary place to live and work on a local farm. And elsewhere, he is said to have picked up casual jobs – including those in construction and fishing – around the state.

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Then, while in Cardwell in Queensland’s far north, Nagy later claimed to have found himself passing a place called Saunders Beach. And with no idea of his real identity, he said, he decided to become Ron Saunders – a name that he supposedly chose because it wasn’t particularly outlandish. After that, Nagy professed, he had continued wandering, finding odd jobs to sustain him along the way.

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Today, then, Nagy has little recollection of the reasoning behind these travels. He has nevertheless said, however, that one of these seemingly random adventures finally led him to the truth. Apparently, you see, he found an old bike at a dump and decided to ride it south. And for three days, he reportedly cycled constantly during daylight hours – stopping only to rest and scavenge food from the trash.

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Then Nagy – or Saunders as he was then known – had supposedly made it to Mackay, where he later maintained that he had stopped to rest. While there, he also purportedly encountered Barry Hayhoe, who was the pastor of the River of Life Church. And even though Nagy hadn’t thought of himself as a homeless man, he asserted, he had still accepted the meals that Hayhoe and his wife had on offer.

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“Apparently, back then I looked like a greyhound,” Nagy told Vision Christian Radio. “All ribs, skin and bone.” After accepting those much-needed meals, then, the man found himself helping out at Hayhoe’s church, he continued. But Nagy wanted more, and before long, as the formerly missing man said to the station, the pastor offered him work as a caretaker – a position that came with its own accommodation.

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Now off the streets, Nagy supposedly spent two years living and working at Mackay’s River of Life Church. Then fleeting memories of his old life suddenly began to rush back to him, he said. “I’d been living under a pseudonym for a long time, but I’d been having flashes of my proper name; things were slowly returning,” Nagy told The Courier-Mail.

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With Hayhoe’s help, then, Nagy was able to reclaim the identity that he had lost many years ago. He also managed to land a permanent job, working part time in a nursing home. But while Nagy’s life was seemingly coming together at last, it wasn’t until his eye surgery that the final pieces of the puzzle fell into place.

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After Robinson tracked Nagy down, she left it up to him to decide whether or not to contact the family that he had left behind. That very afternoon, however, he began penning a letter to his long-lost loved ones. And in the meantime, Pamela, Stephen and Jennifer were informed that the missing man was in fact alive.

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“I sat down and wrote the longest letter I’ve ever written in my life – seven and a half pages on both sides of the paper,” Nagy recalled. Eventually, he finished and popped the note in the post. And only a few days passed before he received a text message that made his heart leap.

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“[The message] said, ‘Hi, Dad,’ and that was enough to make me cry,” Nagy explained. “[Jennifer] wrote that she’d finished the letter, and she still loved me.” And amazingly, Nagy’s long-lost daughter wasn’t the only family member who was keen to get in touch. “Ten minutes later, the phone rang, and it was Pam,” the man recalled. “We talked until the battery died.”

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Just weeks later, Jennifer – who was now 32 years old – decided to fly out to Mackay and reunite with the father that she hadn’t seen for 23 years. “He met me at the airport with a big bunch of flowers,” she told The Courier-Mail. “It was like it was all in slow motion, and we ran through the airport into each other’s arms.”

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Around the same time, Nagy was also able to reunite with his father – although his mother had sadly passed away. Tragically, too, his younger sister had succumbed to a tumor just months previously. But after traveling to Sydney, Nagy got to meet his niece and nephew for the first time. “It was just like in the Bible – the prodigal son coming home,” he told Vision Christian Radio. “It was unreal.”

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Although Nagy plans to continue living in Mackay, he is now in regular contact with Pamela and his children, and the family are making up for lost time. Meanwhile, Jennifer has spoken out about how important it is for the loved ones of missing persons to get answers. “I want to give people hope that sometimes good things can happen – miracles can happen,” she told The Courier-Mail.

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“If you have left home – for whatever reason – ring and let somebody know you are okay,” Jennifer continued. “It doesn’t have to be your family. The not knowing can really, really affect you in the end.” Meanwhile, Nagy himself credits religion for having given him a second chance at life. And even though he knows that his relationship with his children will never be the same as it once was before he disappeared, he is nonetheless grateful for the time that they have been able to share.

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Today, Nagy still bears a scar from the injury that allegedly kickstarted his ordeal. And while he has apparently conquered his addiction to alcohol, he still occasionally struggles with his mental health. “I’m still a bit crazy at times but in a better way than I was before,” he told Vision Christian Radio. “At least I’ve grown up a bit. I’m making better decisions.”

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