This Dude Excavated a Giant Hole in His Backyard, and What He Did With it Is Awesome

Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

Mr. Wayne was a man with troubles on his mind. But he had a plan: he would dig. He would dig and dig and dig until he had gouged out an enormous hole from the earth… and then he would build.

Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

The neighbors may have clucked, but Mr. Wayne – who also goes by the pseudonym of Wayne Martin on YouTube – knew what he was doing. A retired engineer with a love of DIY and firearms (and playing the banjo with Kermit the Frog), he was – like many of his Texas compatriots – a rugged individualist.

Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

His property spanned several acres and included a small vineyard. He owned more than 25 guns and knew how to make his own bullets. Each of his homemade pipe bombs, he claimed, was eight times stronger than a stick of dynamite. So why the hole? And what’s with the container?

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Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

“China has a masterplan to control all of the debt practically worldwide, and especially America’s debt,” explained Mr. Wayne when he starred on National Geographic’s Doomsday Preppers show. And what happens when China calls in its debts? “The American dollar is gonna be worthless, the public is gonna panic, there’s gonna be pillaging like you never saw before.”

Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

But like all dedicated preppers, Mr. Wayne had a contingency plan – and he aimed to thrive in the post-apocalyptic landscape. After digging his hole deep and wide, he applied a six-inch covering of gravel. It was ready. It was time.

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Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

Having searched the internet, he had first procured an old shipping container, 20-feet long. He sealed the doors shut at one end and installed a simple swing door at the other. Solid and durable, this would constitute the basic frame for his construction.

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Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

He hauled the shipping container onto his three-acre ranch with the assistance of a septic tank company. Using its sturdy crane, he positioned the container over the mouth of the hole – carefully does it!

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Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

He lowered the tank inside, leaving four feet of space in front of the doorway and around a foot of space on each side. He would need this room for additional construction work. By this point, you might think you know exactly what Mr. Wayne is up to… but you’re probably wrong.

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Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

The container safely in place, he dug a hole near the doorway and installed a 30-gallon plastic barrel. This would house a sump pump to keep the container dry and protect it from flooding.

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Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

Starting level with the top of the container, he built a flight of concrete steps. This would provide easy access to the door, and of course, he no longer had to climb in and out of the hole with a ladder.

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Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

But much more work needed to be done before he could fill the hole with earth. “These containers are mostly sheet metal,” he explained on his YouTube channel. “Heavy duty as it is, the roof and sides will push inwards from the weight. Eventually the metal will rust through and you’ll be buried alive.” That doesn’t sound like much fun.

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Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

The container would need additional structural support. He set solid metal girders on either side of the steps, creating an enclosure over the top of the stairwell. Around it, he added an extensive framework of wooden beams and planks.

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Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

He laid several sheets of corrugated metal across the frame until the hole was covered from bank to bank. Now well-supported by underlying scaffold, it would soon be time to cover the container.

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Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

First though, more essential work had to be done. Around the edge of the stairwell, he welded rows of rebar steel for reinforcement. He then added rows of blocks and filled them with concrete. The opening to the stairwell was now solid and strong.

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Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

As a vital next step, he braced the roof with temporary planks of two-by-four. His method was meticulous and considered. “My way will ensure it is still there a few hundred years from now,” explained Mr. Wayne. But what was “it”? What was he building?

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Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

Since he intended to bury the container under a thick covering of earth, access to oxygen was a very important concern. He added two 12-inch air vents to the container. For utilities, PVC tubes.

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Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

Finally, it was time for the concrete. He spread it over the roof until the container was covered by a six-inch solid shell, impervious to decay. The internal scaffolding could now be removed.

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Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

His last step was to cover the concrete with soil. “You’ll want to plant trees on top… some day,” explained Mr. Wayne. At a total cost of $12,500, his End-of-Days bunker was complete. But, it turned out, this was no ordinary prepper’s bunker…

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Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

This was a cellar for Mr.Wayne’s homemade wine, which he calls “Wayne’s World.” He produces hundreds of gallons every year. When the apocalypse comes, reasoned Mr. Wayne, gold and dollars will be worthless. But wine? Wine will always be a trade-able commodity, a basis for barter and survival.

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Image: YouTube/Wayne Martin

The United States currently owes China more than a trillion dollars, but since the two countries are heavily dependent on each other for trade, it seems unlikely that China will try to crash the U.S. economy. Whatever the future holds, Mr. Wayne’s bunker seems like a nice cozy place to hide away and enjoy a glass or two. Cheers, Mr. Wayne!

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