This Man Said He’d Been Severely Bullied At School – Then Pointed Out The Culprit Sat In The Room

The effects of being bullied in school can have a lasting impact. For some the trauma can last well into adulthood. That was certainly true for Greg Barrett, a businessman from Katy, Texas. But when he finally came face to face with the perpetrator as an adult, no one could believe the person that he pointed out.

School life for Barrett, it seems, was hard. So hard, in fact, that he now goes by his mother’s maiden name. He cites his given name as being one of the major reasons that he had a hard time when he attended West Memorial Junior High in Katy. The surname he used there was “Gay”.

It may have been over three decades ago but bullying can be a difficult thing to just forget about and move on from. Indeed, Barrett’s story of how he was targeted and tormented in middle school sounds like a harsh one. It’s no surprise, then, that he could recount, in detail, what happened to him all those years ago.

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Barrett claimed that he was “unbelievably bullied” in junior high. “I started out and I had teachers that bullied me. I had kids that bullied me,” he announced to the attendees of Katy’s Independent School District board meeting on March 19, 2018. “I had nobody to turn to.”

Barrett went on to describe one particularly brutal incident. The businessman, who graduated in 1983, claimed he had been set upon by a group of students during lunch break. He alleged that the perpetrators pushed his head into a urinal, cutting his lip in the process.

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As Barrett described, “I had laid on the ground in the fetal position as the kids kicked me. I got up, I rinsed my face off, I walked out of the lunchroom, walked straight to the principal’s office and he told me, ‘These kids will grow up someday. They won’t always be like this.’”

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Barrett was later sent home from school, having been drenched with urine as he lay on the floor. But the incident had been too much for the young man to cope with. He went on to describe to the room how he had thought about taking his own life after he got home.

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As Barrett recalled, “I went home and got the .45 out of my father’s drawer and put it in my mouth. At this point, I had nobody in the school system to help me.” He didn’t pull the trigger, and now, at the school board meeting, he had his eyes locked on one of his alleged attackers.

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“Lance, you were the one who shoved my head in the urinal,” Barrett announced to the room. The man he had singled out was 53-year-old Lance Hindt who, ironically, works as a Katy ISD superintendent. Hindt, however, said nothing to defend the accusation and even seemed to laugh it off.

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Hindt claims he was advised not to talk about an incident that allegedly occurred more than three decades ago. Instead he wrote a letter to his ISD colleagues apologizing for the attention caused by the accusations. Though he admitted he was a student at West Memorial Junior High at the time, he says he was no bully.

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In a separate statement, Hindt said, “I do not suggest that Mr. Barrett was not bullied, only that I was not part of it. Bullying is wrong. Period. It was then and it is today. At Katy ISD, we are always looking for ways to make our campuses and our students safe.”

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Those who knew him at the time, however, paint a very different picture of the teenaged Hindt. David Carpenter, who now serves as a judge in Alabama, went to high school with the now superintendent. Though he was never a victim of the alleged bullying himself, Carpenter claims to have witnessed thuggish behavior from Hindt.

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“[Hindt] was a vicious bully. He was a thug. He was a wealthy thug, but he was a thug,” the judge alleged of the star football player in high school. “He was physically threatening some of my teammates, just menacing them, standing over them and eventually started throwing 25-pound weight plates at them.”

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The bullying, Carpenter claims, was unrelenting for weaker classmates and sometimes terrifying. “He liked to brag about beating up other people and at one point he even bragged about beating up a police officer.” The jurist even professed to an assumption that Hindt would have ended up in prison based on his alleged high school antics.

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And yet, while support for the allegations against Hindt grew, the superintendent appeared to do little to address the accusations. Instead, the superintendent pointed toward an incident in the early 1990s that profoundly changed him and set him on a new path in life.

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Hindt claimed that he found religion in 1992 after hearing a sermon delivered by Houston-based pastor Dr. Ed Young. Hindt wrote in a statement, “Knowing that my past had been washed away and I was a renewed person, I hitched a ride on a wonderful journey that has led me to where I am today.”

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Hindt continued, “When I was young and dumb, I did dumb things. Because of the great teachers, coaches, administrators and mentors in my life and the unconditional love of my parents, I was able to overcome, learn and grow from my childhood mistakes.”

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Barrett felt compelled to tell his story after hearing of continued incidents of bullying in Katy area schools 35 years on. In fact, in detailing the incident, a witness offered to back the businessman up in his claims against Hindt. Chris Dolan, who witnessed the attack reached out to Barrett several years ago to apologize for not intervening.

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Hindt denied any involvement in the alleged attack and remained committed to his role as ISD superintendent. He said in a statement, “I am proud to lead a district that is not afraid to confront bullying behavior, whether in person or online.” Nonetheless, Hindt intends to resign from his post, effective January 2019.

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Indeed, Barrett’s goal in speaking out about the alleged incident was to shine a light on a dark topic that still affects students in the region. He even acknowledged that his accused bully could be the very person to fix it. Barrett told the Houston Chronicle, “People change. They do stupid stuff when they’re young. I just want him to acknowledge it, say he’s sorry and make some changes so this doesn’t continue to happen.”

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