This Vehicle Was Swerving All Over The Road, So A Stranger Pulled An Insane Stunt To Avert Disaster

Every so often, a driver will encounter something remarkable while out on the road. A group of motorists in Illinois can certainly attest to that. That’s because they saw a blue car drive through a red light and swerve across the street in June 2017. However, a stranger then pulled a jaw-dropping stunt to prevent an accident.

A resident of Dixon, Illinois, Randy Tompkins is a former construction worker who now offers his services as a hauler. Driving a pickup truck, he transports a variety of metals in the local area, as well as any garbage that needs disposing of. However, on June 2, 2017, he reached the end of his tether.

The hauler’s truck had just been damaged, leaving him at his wit’s end. Despite that stress, though, he decided to take the pickup out with his wife Heather, who works as an EMT. With the sun beaming down on Dixon, the pair headed towards an intersection, completely unaware of what would happen next.

ADVERTISEMENT

As a number of vehicles sat waiting at a set of traffic lights, a blue car approached on the left-hand side of the intersection. The lights then changed, but before the motorists could pull away, they quickly noticed that the blue vehicle hadn’t stopped. With that in mind, the drivers hit their brakes and let it pass, avoiding a collision.

The blue car then started to swerve across the road, driving straight at the couple. However, Tompkins was quick to put his pickup into reverse to avoid a potential accident. After that, he parked his vehicle up and made a quite incredible decision.

ADVERTISEMENT

With Tompkins’ wife looking on, the hauler dived through the passenger side window of the blue car, as he looked to stop it in its tracks. Thankfully he succeeded, bringing the vehicle to a halt, but there was more to this incident than meets the eye.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I could see [the driver] and his arms were up to his head, close to his chest and he was convulsing,” Tompkins told the Rockford Register Star newspaper in June 2017. “I could tell right away he was having a seizure.” With that in mind, the hauler was cautious as the blue car swerved towards his pickup.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I didn’t know if the guy was gonna push the gas, jerk the wheel or whatever, so I waited as long as I could to back up,” Tompkins explained to the Chicago Tribune. “Once he got about a half-car length away from me, I parked my truck at an angle and jumped out of my vehicle.”

ADVERTISEMENT

From there, Tompkins looked to help the driver as best he could, as he prevented him from biting down on his tongue. “I did that really fast, and then I stopped the car,” the hauler continued. “I was worried, but I would do that for anybody. It just happened to be I was at the right place at the right time.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Incredibly, though, this wasn’t the first time that Tompkins had faced down a driver having a seizure. Indeed, when he was just 16 years old, an elderly woman hit his car after suffering a convulsion. Since then, the trucker has always been wary of what could happen while out on the road.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I always wished I could have gotten out of the way,” Tompkins said of that first incident to the Chicago Tribune. “So I’m always prepared. When I’m driving, I scan ahead as far as I can see because you never know.” However, unbeknown to the hauler, this story was about to take another interesting turn.

ADVERTISEMENT

Unbelievably, the incident was recorded in full on a dash cam. Sharp-eyed police officers Patrick Ginn and Lincoln Sharp spotted the blue car swerving across the intersection. As a result of that, the pair looked to pursue the vehicle, before spotting Tompkins diving through the passenger window.

ADVERTISEMENT

“It happened so fast,” Officer Sharp told the Chicago Tribune. “Initially, you don’t know what’s going on, so obviously the priority for us as police officers is to give our location to dispatch. That way, no matter where it goes, they know what’s going on.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“When [Tompkins] jumped through the window, I just stopped what I was doing on the radio, I didn’t even finish calling it out,” the officer continued. “He kind of downplayed it, but not everybody would have acted that way.” The following day, the Dixon Police Department posted the footage on their Twitter account, with the clip quickly going viral.

ADVERTISEMENT

However, while the police hailed Tompkins’ actions, they also had another message for the public. “Obviously we would not recommend people doing this,” Lieutenant Clay Whelan said. “This individual assessed the situation and thought he could do it safely, and it was definitely a very heroic act on his part.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Prior to that, Tompkins himself took to social media. Indeed, he posted a picture of the car on Facebook and admitted that the adrenaline was still flowing through his veins. Despite his heroics, though, the hauler didn’t forget about the driver who suffered the seizure, offering an update on his condition.

ADVERTISEMENT

“[The driver] messaged me [on Facebook] and thanked me, and said he was going to go see a couple [of] doctors because it was the very first seizure he’s ever had,” Tompkins informed the Chicago Tribune. “I asked him to keep me posted and he said he would.”

ADVERTISEMENT

In another strange coincidence, it was discovered that Tompkins’ wife Heather had also suffered from seizures in the past. With that in mind, the hauler’s actions on that June afternoon didn’t come as much of a shock to her, as she hailed her husband’s quick thinking behind the wheel.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I wasn’t surprised,” Heather told the Rockford Register Star. “He did exactly what I thought he would do, and he did it perfectly.” Indeed, while Tompkins displayed incredible selflessness during the incident, it’s easy to forget that he was just a stranger to the unfortunate driver of the blue vehicle.

ADVERTISEMENT

In the eyes of Officer Sharp, that made Tompkins’ actions all the more special. “A lot of people may have just gotten out their phones or just watched,” he told the Chicago Tribune. “But to see that and recognize that something wasn’t right? It was pretty tremendous.”

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT