People Have Looked At Harry And Meghan’s Wedding Invitation And Think They’ve Found A Typo

Every wedding is a major event for the couple which ties the knot, but it’s rarer that a pair’s nuptials attract global attention. Still, that’s exactly what happens when a member of the British royal family weds.

So on such a special, internationally scrutinized occasion, spectators expect every last detail to be perfect. That’s why the invitations to Prince Harry’s wedding to Meghan Markle caused such a stir. It seems eagle-eyed royal watchers thought they’d found a typo or two.

The fairytale relationship between a British prince and Hollywood actress Markle began like many other modern love stories. Just as with countless non-celebrity couples, a mutual friend introduced the pair. Instantly, Harry knew he had “to up [his] game,” he told Vogue magazine in 2016.

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That was because the 33-year-old royal, fifth in line for the British throne, fell for Markle quickly. A source divulged to the Sunday Express in October 2016, “It’s no exaggeration to say he’s besotted with her.”

From there, the paparazzi captured images of date nights in London and published tales of their travels to Jamaica, Victoria Falls and the Invictus Games, a sporting competition for injured members of the military founded by Prince Harry himself.

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On November 27, 2017 – just over a year after they went on that first blind date – Markle and her prince announced their engagement. Cameras snapped as she flashed the ring on THAT finger, and they began divulging the details of their big day soon after.

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By the next day, Queen Elizabeth II had given her blessing for her grandson and his fiancée to have their wedding at St. George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle, one of the Royal Family’s most iconic pieces of property.

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Their chosen church was likely selected because it offered the pair more intimacy and privacy than other potential venues. For example, Westminster Abbey – where Harry’s brother William married Kate Middleton in 2011 – stands in the heart of London and seats up to 2,000 guests.

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But that wasn’t the only way the May 19 nuptials are set to differ from the royal norm. Indeed, Markle and Prince Harry were determined that their 2018 wedding day would involve everyday British citizens, rather than world leaders.

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So, the couple has invited 1,200 members of the public to fill the grounds at Windsor Castle, the perfect perch from which to cheer as the royal couple walks into the chapel. They may also catch glimpses of the carriage leaving after the newly-weds say, “I do.” Many of the chosen spectators have earned their place through exemplary charity or community work.

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But the 600 wedding guests invited inside St. George’s Chapel received a different invitation in the mail – one that Kensington Palace decided to share online ahead of the big day. And that’s when people began to wonder if a few details were, well, amiss.

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The invitation read, “His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales requests the pleasure of the company of _______ at the marriage of his royal highness Prince Henry of Wales with Ms. Meghan Markle at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle on Saturday, 19th May 2018 at 12 noon.”

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There were three items within this sentence alone that grabbed readers’ attention. For starters, many observers felt sure it was a mistake that the prince’s first name was written as Henry instead of Harry.

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However, it turns out that Harry, the moniker by which the 33-year-old royal is usually known, is actually a nickname. Officially, the prince’s full name is Henry Charles Albert David, so the invitation writers had in fact identified the royal groom properly after all.

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Fans of Markle’s thought they had pinpointed another mistake. Although she goes by Meghan, it’s actually her middle name: her given name is Rachel. Even the Queen’s official blessing of the pair, in which she consented to their marriage, listed the bride-to-be as “Rachel Meghan Markle.”

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Ultimately, though, the invitations didn’t reflect the Queen’s formal statement, but rather the name preferred by Markle herself. She wanted them to say “Meghan,” as that’s the name she has always used.

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Finally, viewers of the missive questioned the prefix used to describe Markle. She was listed as Ms. Meghan Markle, whereas the invitations to Prince William and Kate Middleton’s wedding listed the bride-to-be as “Miss.”

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But it transpires that this was also a deliberate switch. Middleton’s marriage to Prince William in 2011 was her first. On the other hand, Markle’s union with Prince Harry will be her second; she married actor and producer Trevor Engelson in 2011 before their 2013 divorce.

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When presented with a first name, the prefix “Miss” is considered the respectful way to address an unmarried woman. “Ms”, often used when a person’s marital status isn’t clear, was most likely chosen because Markle isn’t technically unmarried.

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But on May 19, 2018, Markle will become married to a real-life prince – and the couple can rest assured that their invitations were, indeed, flawless. The rest of the day will doubtless follow suit, and the world will watch as it all beautifully unfolds.

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