The Scandalous Truth Behind Why This Star Is Apparently Being Axed From Netflix

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Lori Loughlin is best known for playing lovable Aunt Becky in popular comedy show Full House. However, in 2019 it was reported that the actress had been dropped from its Netflix spin-off Fuller House. And the scandalous truth behind the alleged axing left fans shocked.

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Loughlin was born in New York City, but grew up on Long Island. She enjoyed acting as a child, but started out her career as a model at the age of 11. Just a few years later – when Loughlin was 15 – she secured her first major TV role, starring as wannabe dancer Jody Travis in ABC show The Edge of Night.

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Loughlin appeared in The Edge of Night for three years. She then left the soap opera in 1983 and went on to star in a series of films and TV shows. However, it was in 1988 that the actress secured what’s probably her most famous role, playing Rebecca Donaldson in the ABC comedy Full House.

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Sitcom Full House chronicles the life of widowed father-of-three Danny Tanner (Bob Saget) as he raises his daughters with a little help from his brother-in-law Jesse (John Stamos) and best friend Joey Gladston (Dave Coulier). Donaldson enters the narrative in season two, when TV star Tanner is paired with her to host a local breakfast show.

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Initially, Loughlin’s part on the show was expected to be short-lived. However, her six-episode deal was made permanent when Donaldson fell for main character Katsopolis. The characters eventually married and later welcomed twin boys named Nicky and Alex. Consequently, Full House made Loughlin a star, known to many viewers affectionately as Aunt Becky.

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The series ran for eight years over 192 episodes. While not critically acclaimed, Full House was hugely popular with audiences. As a result, when the show was canceled in 1995, 24.3 million people tuned in to watch the special hour-long series finale – reportedly representing a 25 percent audience share.

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Following her role in Full House, Loughlin appeared in a number of successful TV shows including 90210 and Summerland. Off-screen, Loughlin also started a family with her second husband Mossimo Giannulli, who she’d married in 1997. The couple have two daughters named Isabella Rose and Olivia Jade.

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Though Loughlin enjoyed successes after Full House, the popularity of the show meant that it never really disappeared from the public zeitgeist. As a result, Loughlin and her co-stars appeared in a number of reunions over the years. And in 2015 it was reported that Netflix was planning a reboot of the show.

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The spin-off was confirmed in April 2015 and filming began just a few months later in July. The show, named Fuller House, follows Tanner’s oldest daughter D.J. (Candace Cameron Bure) who, like her dad, has been widowed and left to raise her three children alone. To help her cope, her sister Stephanie (Jodie Sweetin), friend Kimmy (Andrea Barber) move in to her San Francisco home.

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Fuller House starred a number of original Full House cast members, including Loughlin who reprised her role as Donaldson in a number of episodes. However, the actress’ stint on the show may have been cut short after she became embroiled in a college admissions scandal that rocked the United States in 2019.

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At the time news of the scandal broke, Netflix had recently renewed Fuller House for a fifth and concluding season. However, there were no plans for Loughlin to appear in the series, despite the fact that the actress had starred in previous seasons. And Fuller House wasn’t the only work that appeared to dry up for Loughlin.

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In March 2019 the Hallmark Channel cut ties with the Loughlin, who appeared in the network’s period drama When Calls the Heart. Hallmark announced it had parted ways with the actress in a statement. And in it, the channel mentioned the scandal that Loughlin was allegedly involved in.

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The statement was obtained by The Washington Post in March 2019. It read, “We are saddened by the recent news surrounding the college admissions allegations. We are no longer working with Lori Loughlin and have stopped development of all productions… involving Lori Loughlin including Garage Sale Mysteries, an independent third party production.”

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The allegations being referenced linked Loughin to an admissions scandal in which parents were accused of using a scheme to bribe their children into top colleges. In exchange for large sums of money, college admissions advisor William Rick Singer allegedly inflated test scores. And he also apparently bribed officials to fraudulently win students college places.

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Parents who approached Singer for help with their children’s college applications reportedly spent sums of between $200,000 to $6.5 million to secure places at certain schools. In many causes, the students involved were themselves seemingly oblivious to the bribes. This came to light following an FBI investigation known as Operation Varsity Blues.

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In March 2019 some 50 people were charged in relation to the bribing scheme, which was allegedly worth more than $25 million. Their alleged crimes involved the exchange of cash for students’ places at elite colleges – some of which accepted students as athletes whether they had sporting talent or not. It’s thought that some students were also helped to cheat on their university entrance exams.

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According to reports, prosecutors have alleged that some students were helped through their college exams by having someone else sit in for them. Alternatively, some had their answers corrected later. The scheme – which was organized by Singer – ran from 2011 and 2018 and involved kids from over 750 families.

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Among those charged in the case were parents of students, SAT and ACT administrators, one test proctor and a number of coaches from a range of universities. And some of the people named in the indictment worked for some high-profile colleges. These include Yale, the University of Southern California (U.S.C.), the University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of Texas.

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The indictment included complaints against 33 parents – and among them were Loughlin and her husband Giannulli. They were accused of exchanging $500,000 in order to get their two daughters into the University of Southern California. The couple reportedly turned to the scheme after learning that their oldest girl’s grades would perhaps fall short.

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An extract from the indictment which included details of Loughlin and her husband’s alleged involvement in the scam was reported by CBS News. It read, “In an email on or about July 24, 2016, [a confidential witness] advised Giannulli that his older daughter’s academic qualifications were at or just below the ‘low end’ of U.S.C.’s admission standards.”

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The indictment continued, “Thereafter, the Giannullis agreed… to use bribes to facilitate her admission to U.S.C. as a recruited crew coxswain, even though she did not row competitively or otherwise participate in crew.” Furthermore, Loughlin and her husband were accused of paying $50,000 to Donna Heinel, the athletics administrator at U.S.C.

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After reportedly receiving money from Loughlin and her husband, the indictment states that Heinel introduced the couple’s daughter “to the U.S.C. subcommittee for athletic admissions as a purported crew recruit.” And so as a result of this, prosecutors charged Heinel on the grounds that she was conspiring to commit racketeering.

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After their daughter gained a place at U.S.C., Loughlin and Giannulli reportedly made a tax-deductible payment of $200,000 to a foundation run by Singer. The couple are then accused of repeating the scheme for their youngest daughter. She was also subsequently accepted into U.S.C. as a crew coxswain, despite the fact she was not a rower at all.

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The section of the indictment relating to Loughlin’s second daughter revealed the lengths the family allegedly went to in order to portray her as rower. They were accused of falsifying information for their daughter’s rowing crew profile. And they also apparently arranged a photograph of her using a rowing machine.

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The indictment read, “On or about July 16, 2017, [the confidential witness] emailed the Giannulis requesting information for the crew profile. The confidential witness indicated that the profile would present their younger daughter, falsely, as a crew coxswain for the L.A. Marina Club team and requested that the Giannulis send an ‘action picture.’”

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Prosecutors alleged that Loughlin and Giannuli once again paid $50,000 to Heinel and made another $200,000 donation to Singer’s foundation to secure the U.S.C. place for their daughter. That took the total sum of their alleged payments to $500,000. As a result, as CNN reported, they were charged with “conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud.”

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Following the rather damning indictment, a number of FBI agents reportedly arrested Giannulli at his home. He then later made an appearance in court – but he was later released on a bond said to be worth $1 million. This was allegedly secured by the home he shares with Loughlin.

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Loughlin – who was filming in Canada when Giannulli was reportedly arrested – later returned to Los Angeles to turn herself in. Like her husband, she put up her home as collateral to assure her $1 million bond. She is permitted to travel to British Columbia for work, but has been ordered to hand in her passport when her part in the project has wrapped.

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Loughlin and her husband will appear in court in April 2019. However, no matter the outcome of the case the actress has seemingly already lost work, following her dismissal from Hallmark and her reported exclusion from the final series of Fuller House. And there were also repercussions for her two daughters.

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Loughlin’s youngest daughter Olivia Jade is a popular social media influencer. However, when news of the scandal broke, she lost deals with TRESemmé and Sephora. She and her sister Isabella were also reported to have left U.S.C. over fears they may be bullied. However, a U.S.C. spokesperson later confirmed that both Giannulli girls were still enrolled at the college.

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But with that said, the spokesperson revealed that the college would be looking into the alleged incidents of bribery. “U.S.C. is conducting a case-by-case review for current students and graduates that may be connected to the scheme alleged by the government and will make informed decisions as those reviews are completed,” they told CNBN.

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However, Loughlin and her husband weren’t the only notable people indicted in the college admissions scandal. Speaking of the 33 moms and dads named, Attorney Andrew Lelling said, “These parents are a catalog of wealth and privilege.” And among them were successful business people, as well as Loughlin’s fellow actress Felicity Huffman.

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Huffman is perhaps best known for starring as Lynette Scarvo in Desperate Housewives. But she also earned a Golden Globe and an Academy Award nomination for her performance in 2005’s Transamerica. Huffman is married to Fargo star William H. Macy and the couple have two daughters named Georgia and Sophia.

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Huffman is reportedly accused of paying $15,000 to one of Singer’s organizations. He then allegedly arranged for a proctor to help Huffman’s daughter cheat on her SAT exam by correcting her answers. With that in mind, Huffman was charged with conspiring to undertake mail fraud and honest services fraud.

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Both Loughlin and Huffman have declined to comment on the allegations against them. However, many of the colleges linked to the scandal issued statements, including U.S.C. – where Loughlin’s daughters attend. In the statement, a spokesperson revealed that the university was cooperating with the investigation.

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The statement revealed how the college was tied to the investigation, but denied any involvement as an institution. It read, “The federal government has alleged that U.S.C. is a victim in a scheme perpetrated against the university by a long-time Athletics Department employee, one current coach and three former coaching staff.”

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The statement then suggested as to how the college intended to handle the issue. “We will be implementing significant process and training enhancements to prevent anything like this from ever happening again,” it read. “U.S.C. has not been accused of any wrongdoing and will continue to cooperate fully with the government’s investigation.”

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The College Board – a non-profit organization responsible for administering SATs – also commented on the investigation. “Today’s arrests resulting from an investigation conducted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Massachusetts send a clear message that those who facilitate cheating on the SAT – regardless of their income or status – will be held accountable,” read a statement from the group.

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The statement continued, “The College Board has a comprehensive, robust approach to combat cheating and we work closely with law enforcement as part of those efforts. We will always take all necessary steps to ensure a level playing field for the overwhelming majority of test takers who are honest and play by the rules.”

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And while Loughlin and Huffman’s fates so far remain unknown, Singer – the man behind the admission bribery scheme – has already pleaded guilty. The charges against him included conspiracy to defraud the United States, conspiracy to commit money laundering, and obstruction of justice. As a result, he could potentially go to prison for 65 years and receive a $1.25 million fine.

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