This Is The Surprising Reason Why Morgan Freeman Destroyed His 124-Acre Ranch

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From the early 1990s, Oscar winner Morgan Freeman has owned a stunning 124-acre Mississippi ranch. The much-loved actor actually built the property on land that he purchased from his mother and father, and undoubtedly he’s made many happy memories there since. So, it may come as a surprise to hear that, more recently, Freeman tore some of his place down – even if he had a very good reason for doing so.

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Freeman has long had ties to the state of Mississippi, as in his infancy he was sent to live with his paternal grandmother in the city of Charleston. The actor also called Greenwood his home during his high school years before he ultimately left for Hollywood. But while forging a glittering career in Tinseltown, he realized that he missed a simpler life.

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So, back in 1991, Freeman bought land from his parents, with the plot having also previously been owned by his grandparents. Then the star assisted in building a spectacular hacienda-inspired property on the site near Charleston. As a keen horseman, Freeman ensured that the ranch featured several mounts.

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And in a 2012 interview with Garden and Gun magazine, Freeman was asked why he had returned to the area in which he had spent his formative years. To this, the Academy Award winner simply replied, “I realized it’s where I was happiest. It’s where I belong.” Yet, just two years later, Freeman decided to make a drastic change to the property that had brought him so much joy.

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Way before Freeman ever became a household name, though, he was born in the Tennessee city of Memphis in 1937 as the son of a teacher mother and barber father. And the future actor lived a relatively nomadic childhood, spending time in Indiana and Chicago as well as Mississippi. But even during this constant state of upheaval, Freeman managed to develop the talents that would later launch him to worldwide fame.

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Freeman first took to the stage as a nine-year-old, in fact, as part of a school production. Then, after winning a drama contest held statewide, he showcased his acting skills on a Nashville radio program. In his late teens, however, Freeman put his ambitions on hold to join the U.S. military. He subsequently spent four years in the Air Force, where he rose to the rank of Airman 1st Class.

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But following a move to the bright lights of Los Angeles, Freeman resumed his passion for performing. He enjoyed stints in the San Francisco-based musical theater troupe known as The Opera Ring as well as the touring cast of The Royal Hunt of the Sun. And in 1968 Freeman made his Broadway debut appearing alongside Cab Calloway and Pearl Bailey in an all-African-American take on Hello, Dolly!

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Then after gracing the big screen for the first time in 1971 family drama Who Says I Can’t Ride a Rainbow!, Freeman joined the cast of The Electric Company. He actually spent six years on PBS’ hugely popular kids’ TV show, playing characters such as Vincent the Vegetable Vampire and Mel Mounds the DJ. Yet it was on the stage where Freeman’s career truly flourished.

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In 1980, for instance, Freeman picked up a prestigious Obie Award for his performance as the eponymous lead in a production of Shakespeare’s Coriolanus. He went on to repeat this feat for his turns as a preacher in The Gospel at Colonus and as a chauffeur in Driving Miss Daisy. And, of course, it was the big-screen adaptation of the latter play that cemented Freeman as a bona fide Hollywood star.

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Freeman had already received an Oscar nomination by the time Driving Miss Daisy hit movie theaters, having earned a Best Supporting Actor nod for his turn in the little-seen drama Street Smart. But his reprisal of the role of chauffeur Hoke in Daisy was enjoyed by a much larger audience – and led to him making the first of three Best Actor Academy Award shortlists.

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And after impressing in American Civil War drama Glory as Sergeant Major Rawlins, Freeman hit something of a purple patch. He enjoyed box-office success in medieval epic Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, Western Unforgiven, serial killer thriller Se7en and disaster movie Deep Impact. He received further awards attention, too, for portraying prisoner Red in The Shawshank Redemption.

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Then, in 1997, Freeman turned his attention behind the scenes by co-founding Revelations Entertainment with producer Lori McCreary. Yet the star continued to rack up the film credits, and in 2005 he finally got the chance to make an acceptance speech at the Academy Awards. Yes, as fans will know, Freeman was crowned Best Supporting Actor for his turn in Clint Eastwood’s boxing drama Million Dollar Baby.

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That same year, Freeman lent his trademark booming baritone to both War of the Worlds and the hugely successful documentary March of the Penguins. In front of the cameras, meanwhile, the actor played God in comedy Bruce Almighty and Lucius Fox in Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy. And in 2007 Freeman starred alongside another Hollywood veteran, Jack Nicholson, in The Bucket List.

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But following a return to the Broadway stage in The Country Girl, Freeman landed the role he was perhaps born to play. After years of trying to get a Nelson Mandela project off the ground, the actor finally had the chance to portray the South African icon in biopic Invictus. For his efforts, he was rewarded with a fifth Oscar nomination.

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After that, Freeman joined an all-star cast, including Bruce Willis, in the adaptation of comic book Red. And after adding to his Broadway credits with Dustin Lance Black’s 8, the star subsequently showed up in action movie Olympus Has Fallen, Tom Cruise sci-fi epic Oblivion and golden years comedy Last Vegas. Freeman also made a surprise return to television with a three-episode stint in Madam Secretary.

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Freeman not only appeared as the Chief Justice of the United States in the legal drama, but he also directed its second season premiere. And this wasn’t the first time that the star had taken up such a role. Previously, he had also helmed Bopha! – a 1993 movie adaptation of the stage play set in apartheid-era South Africa.

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And Freeman shows no signs of slowing down in his 80s, either. More recently, he has appeared in front of the cameras in Going in Style, Just Getting Started and The Nutcracker and the Four Realms. The star also lent his familiar tones to historical adventure Alpha and hosted documentary series The Story of Us with Morgan Freeman.

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During his early years in showbiz, meanwhile, Freeman was supported by his first wife, Jeannette Adair Bradshaw. Sadly, though, the couple split in 1979 after 12 years of marriage. Then, in 1984, the actor tied the knot for a second time to Myrna Colley-Lee. But, yet again, the union ultimately fell apart, and in 2010 Freeman was left heading for the divorce courts.

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Then there are Freeman’s children, with his firstborn, Alfonso, arriving as a result of the star’s affair with a woman named Loletha Polk-Adkins. And while Alfonso didn’t actually forge a relationship with his father until his mid-20s, he still ended up following in his acting footsteps, with dad and son sharing the screen in The Shawshank Redemption, Se7en and The Bucket List.

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Freeman’s second son, flight instructor Saifoulaye, was then born in the early 1960s following the star’s relationship with an anonymous woman. Saifoulaye was followed in 1971 by daughter Morgana – the only child of the actor and his first wife, Jeannette. And in time, Freeman and his second wife, Myrna, even ended up adopting his step-granddaughter. Tragically, though, E’dena Hines was found murdered in 2015 at the age of just 33.

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It should be known, too, that Freeman isn’t afraid to speak up on the issues he cares about. In recent years, for example, he’s backed both Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton’s respective presidential campaigns. And during a 2017 video made by the Committee to Investigate Russia, Freeman had strong words to share, claiming that the U.S. is “at war” with the Vladimir Putin-led nation.

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Yet the star has put his considerable fame to good use in other areas. For instance, in 2004 he co-founded a relief fund designed to help Grenadians whose lives had been impacted by Hurricane Ivan. This charitable endeavor has since evolved into an organization called PLANIT NOW, which aids those living in areas vulnerable to natural disasters.

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The environment is a general concern of Freeman’s, in fact, and he has used his signature calming voice to narrate several clips for awareness-raising organizations such as One Earth. In 2014 he similarly joined forces with Louie Schwartzberg for What’s Possible – a documentary short about the dangers of global warming that was shown at the United Nations Climate Summit.

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And in 2007 Freeman told online green magazine Grist, “I don’t need any more press. I get enough when I work, but environmental causes [are] one place where you can get me to open my mouth – and put my foot in it if necessary. I think the only thing I do that gives me any bragging rights in terms of energy conservation is sailing just using wind power.”

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Freeman also explained to the website that he’d been an environmentalist for quite some time. He said, “I don’t remember what year it was, but it was back in the ’80s, and I was in New York. A bus came up and then took off, and I had to hold my breath. And I thought, you know, that’s what it is.”

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“Then you start looking at places like Santiago, Los Angeles, Beijing, Singapore – all of these places where people are literally dying from the air,” Freeman continued. “Wherever there are densities of people, we have environmental problems, and now it’s pretty much global. So, what are we talking here – about 25 years of concern?”

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In 2019, however, Freeman proved how dedicated he is to environmental issues by setting his sights on the worrying decrease in the bee population. And he went above and beyond to do his bit by essentially converting his beloved Mississippi home into a bee sanctuary.

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In fact, Freeman decided to import no fewer than 26 beehives to his 124-acre ranch in Charleston from Arkansas. The actor then fed the insects water and sugar as he got to work building a suitable habitat. This included planting fruit and magnolia trees as well as lavender and clover – all of which would aid the pollinators.

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Freeman had first talked publicly about his passion for beekeeping when he’d appeared on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon in 2014. There, the actor told the host that while he’d only recently discovered an interest in the insects, he already felt comfortable in their company. And because of this, he didn’t feel the need to wear a protective suit when around his swarms.

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Fallon seemingly felt slightly skeptical about his guest’s confidence in his bees, as he explained to Freeman that such outfits are designed for a very specific reason. Yet the star insisted that he had nothing to worry about, adding, “I’m never going to get stung. They have the outfits for people who can’t resonate [with the bees].”

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And Freeman had a theory as to why the bees have so far steered clear of him. He told Fallon, “They haven’t [stung me] yet, because right now I’m not trying to harvest honey or anything, I’m just feeding them… I think they understand, ‘Hey, don’t bother this guy, he’s got sugar water here.’”

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Freeman went on to tell the host why he had taken up beekeeping, saying, “There’s a concerted effort to bring bees back onto the planet. We do not realize that they are the foundation, I think, of the growth of the planet, the vegetation. I have so many flowering things, and I have a gardener too.”

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And it appears that Freeman’s gardener has been vital to the actor’s conservation efforts. He went on, “Because [my gardener] takes care of the bees, too, all she does is figure out, ‘Okay, what would they like to have?’ So we’ve got acres and acres of clover, [and] we’re planting stuff like lavender. I’ve got, like, maybe 140 magnolia trees – big blossoms.”

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Yet while this beekeeping chat with Fallon was fairly jovial, things got a little more serious when Freeman discussed the issue with Larry King two years later. During that appearance, the actor called out both the U.S. government and farming conglomerate Monsanto, claiming that they were responsible for a “frightening loss of bee colonies.”

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And it’s true that the increased use of pesticides – not to mention man-made changes to various species of plants – has seriously threatened the natural environment of bees. In the first couple of decades of the 21st century, beekeepers across America discovered that ‘colony collapse disorder’ had destroyed many of their hives, with the result being the disappearance of millions of the insects.

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This could all have disastrous effects on the world’s food supply, as the bee population pollinates various plants. And as the number of bees dwindles across the world, agricultural and ecological problems have arisen – and are continuing to increase – as a result.

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The efforts to preserve the bee population also took a blow in 2018, when Donald Trump’s administration rescinded a ban put in place by his predecessor. Barack Obama had previously implemented a restriction on the use of pesticides connected with the decreasing population of wild bees. And environmentalists believe that lifting the ban has significantly increased the dangers posed to pollinators.

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But while beekeeping may seem an unlikely hobby for a major Hollywood star to pursue, Freeman isn’t the only A-list actor to show a keen interest in the insects. Scarlett Johansson, who appeared alongside Freeman in Luc Besson’s sci-fi thriller Lucy, is supposedly also a fan.

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Johansson apparently took up the hobby after being gifted a beehive by Samuel L. Jackson for her wedding to fellow superhero star Ryan Reynolds. The glamorous pair reportedly tended to the insects themselves, too, with Johansson even using the honey they harvested in her daily skincare routine.

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Coincidentally, Freeman will soon be seen sharing the screen with both Reynolds and Jackson in the 2020 action-comedy sequel The Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard. Also among the actor’s upcoming movies is a remake of 1982 comedy The Comeback Trail, in which he will appear alongside Robert De Niro and Tommy Lee Jones.

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However, one former co-star of Freeman’s appears to have vanished completely from Hollywood. And given that Jack Nicholson hasn’t formally announced his retirement, fans may be wondering just what prompted the movie legend to take a step back – or whether we’ll watch him perform once more.

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When Nicholson began making movies in the 1950s, he surely couldn’t have imagined the glittering career that lay before him. This is a star, after all, who’s garnered a staggering 12 Oscar nominations across five decades – including three wins in the high-profile acting categories. Nicholson’s films have also earned more than $2 billion at the global box office. Yet in 2010 the superstar suddenly stopped making pictures altogether. So what happened to force Nicholson into early retirement? And will we ever see him on screen again?

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There is certainly still an audience hungry to see Nicholson at work. In 2002, for example, About Schmidt hit theaters and scored over $100 million in worldwide box-office receipts. Plus, the star’s gentle and understated portrayal of a Nebraska widower reflecting on mortality was rewarded with another Academy Award nod. So although Nicholson didn’t act in many films in the 2000s, his output was still of the highest quality.

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In 2006’s The Departed, too, critics loved his turn as villainous Bostoner Frank Costello – and the movie ran away with four Oscars and a host of other awards. The star also received nominations for Best Supporting Actor at the Golden Globes and the BAFTAs. If Nicholson was still at the top of his game, then, what was it that scared him away from Hollywood?

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He must have had a good reason – because Nicholson has led a very interesting life, right from the very beginning. The star was born in April 1937 in New Jersey. But his showgirl mom, June, was involved in a bigamous marriage with a man who, it turned out, very likely was not Nicholson’s father. And because his mother was only a teen at the time, the young Nicholson was raised by his grandma and led to believe that his mom was his older sister. Nicholson only found out the truth after they had both passed on.

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Known as “Nick” in high school, the future superstar gained a reputation as the class clown. Perhaps unsurprisingly, too, his unruly behavior often landed him in trouble and made him a regular in detention. Then, in the late 1950s, Nicholson tried to avoid the draft by joining the Californian Air National Guard – but he did serve on active duty for a while.

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But by that time, Nicholson had already started work in Hollywood. His first gig, in 1954, was in the offices of animators William Hanna and Joseph Barbera. But his heart was set on being an actor. So after some training, Nicholson started to pick up bit parts, notably for trailblazing producer Roger Corman. And in 1958 The Cry Baby Killer put Nicholson on the big screen for the first time.

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In 1962, while still working as a jobbing actor, Nicholson married for the first and only time. And during the six-year union of the star and Sandra Knight, the couple had a daughter called Jennifer. The actor is also believed to have had a child with Susan Anspach, his co-star in Five Easy Pieces. Then, in 1981, Nicholson had a daughter with actress Dane Winnie Hollman. The following decade brought two more kids with actress Rebecca Broussard as well. So could family commitments be behind the star’s reasons for retreating from the limelight?

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Well, let’s return to Nicholson’s career to find out. In the 1960s, you see, the actor’s roles were drying up. And as a result, he focused on writing and directing. Nicholson had some success too: his script for The Trip became a 1967 film featuring Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper. The star also helped write the Monkees’ film excursion, Head – apparently while tripping on acid. Whatever the truth of that, though, the film was a bomb and ended the Monkees’ time on the big screen.

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Yet Nicholson walked away unscathed from Head and would soon catch his big break. His Oscar-nominated performance in 1969’s Easy Rider helped boost a sub-million-dollar film to a box-office smash – and lifted Nicholson to the level of a hero of the counterculture. And given that the film made his career, Nicholson was no doubt glad that first-choice actor Rip Torn fell out with Hopper and subsequently left the part open.

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Another Academy Award nomination followed for Nicholson’s depiction of an oil worker in Five Easy Pieces. The 1970 film reinforced the actor’s “anti-hero” status, though, and he consequently urged his agent to go out and find him roles that would stretch his talent. According to author Dennis McDougal, the actor said, “I like to play people that haven’t existed yet – a ‘cusp character.’”

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And the agent certainly found Nicholson some interesting roles. In 1971 the star took the lead in dramedy Carnal Knowledge. Director Mike Nichols believed that Nicholson was one of the few people who could take on the part, and his faith was rewarded as the actor earned a Golden Globe nomination. And a couple of years later, Nicholson’s turn in The Last Detail also scored critical acclaim – and nominations for an Oscar and a Golden Globe.

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Nicholson’s performance as hardboiled private eye Jake Gittes in 1974’s Chinatown saw the star earn himself yet another Oscar nod. Yes, Nicholson was one to watch. In his book 27 movies from the Dark Side: Ebert’s Essentials, author Roger Ebert argued that the actor is “a man attractive to audiences because he suggests both comfort and danger… From Gittes forward, Nicholson created the persona of a man who had seen it all and was still capable of being wickedly amused.”

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In 1975 Nicholson finally brought home an Academy Award for Best Actor – for playing a patient in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. And the character’s blend of caring for others and not giving a hoot for authority appealed strongly to audiences across the globe, eventually bringing in $163 million at the box office. A lot of the character came from Nicholson’s invention, too, as director Miloš Forman often prompted him to improvise.

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In Marie Brenner’s review in the Texas Monthly in 1976, she acclaimed the actor’s turn as “far above the general run of Hollywood performances.” She said, “Nicholson is everywhere; his energy propels the ward of loonies and makes of them an ensemble, a chorus of people caught in a bummer with nowhere else to go – but still fighting for some frail sense of themselves.”

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Nicholson’s list of interesting parts continued to grow as he took the lead in The Passenger in 1975. Then, the following year, he made a dream come true when he appeared with personal hero Marlon Brando in The Missouri Breaks. Apparently, Nicholson had watched Brando in On the Waterfront more than three dozen times.

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And the 1980s opened with another iconic role for Nicholson: playing the lead in Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining. The director even trusted the actor’s talent enough to allow him to improvise, and it led to the invention of the memorable line: “Here’s Johnny!” Still, Kubrick’s infamous attention to detail led to repeating takes over and over – in one case as many as three dozen times.

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A low-key Nicholson role came in The Border, where he followed director Tony Richardson’s advice that “less is more.” And another understated performance followed as the star won a second Oscar – this time for Best Supporting Actor in 1984’s Terms of Endearment. Biographer Patrick McGilligan hailed this as one of the actor’s most complicated characters, too.

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The rest of the decade proved a golden period for Nicholson, as he starred in hit after hit. Oscar nods also came for Ironweed, Reds and Prizzi’s Honor. And he rounded out the decade with a performance that he was personally extremely proud of: Joker, in 1989’s Batman. The movie was a huge hit, too – not least for Nicholson. He’d secured points in the film’s box office, you see, potentially netting him as much as $90 million.

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In 1992 Nicholson was nominated for an Academy Award yet again for his role in A Few Good Men. And reviewers didn’t hold back in their praise for the star’s turn as Colonel Nathan R. Jessup in the movie. One critic even called Nicholson’s turn “spellbinding” and suggested that his character “blazed and roared.”

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Nicholson’s role in 1992’s Hoffa divided opinion, though. In fact, he managed to win a nomination for the worst actor Razzie and for a Best Actor Golden Globe. His spot in Man Trouble in the same year also gained him some brickbats. Still, Nicholson popped up again as two characters in Tim Burton’s 1996 romp Mars Attacks!

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And the following year Nicholson returned to the Oscars to pick up an award for Best Actor for his part in As Good As It Gets. The critics weren’t alone in loving the movie, either, as it proved a massive box-office success – confirming that Nicholson was still at the top of the acting game. But, unbeknown to the public, this role would mark the beginning of the end of the star’s output.

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Around the end of the 1990s, though, Lara Flynn Boyle became the latest in a string of ladies who had fallen for “the man no woman could resist.” But Nicholson and Boyle split in 2004, and the once-legendary womanizer – it’s claimed that he’s bedded 2,000 women – became solitary. And apparently, by the late 2010s, Nicholson was a lonely figure.

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The 1990s also highlighted a controversial occurrence in the actor’s career. In 1994, you see, a motorist accused Nicholson of vandalizing his car with a golf club. The event was alleged to have taken place after the star had felt he’d been cut off while in traffic. Nicholson later referred to the moment as “a shameful incident in [his] life.”

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The actor subsequently faced charges of vandalism and assault, though the case went away after Nicholson agreed to a settlement. In 2007 the star blamed his busy schedule and hectic personal life for the incident. He explained to Golf Digest, “I was on my way to the course, and in the midst of this madness I somehow knew what I was doing because I reached into my trunk and specifically selected a club I never used on the course: my 2-iron.”

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Nevertheless, the 2000s saw little diminution of Nicholson’s star power – although he did start to slow down in terms of the number of his appearances. For instance, after About Schmidt came a couple of comedy roles. And then in 2006 he popped up in a monster success again, as Frank Costello in Martin Scorsese’s The Departed. The actor followed that up with another comedy called The Bucket List.

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In 2010, though, Nicholson made what is – at the time of writing – his last film appearance. And it all looked promising for How Do You Know. The cast was stellar, and director James L. Brooks had enjoyed countless successes – including helming Nicholson to Oscars with Terms of Endearment and As Good As It Gets. But what looked good on paper didn’t look so great on screen.

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In fact, critics hated How Do You Know. The A.V. Club’s Nathan Rabin described it as “hopelessly muddled,” while Roger Ebert moaned, “I expected this movie to be better.” Ebert also suggested that the script had let Nicholson down, saying that his character had been written as a “creep.” Fans seemingly agreed, and moviegoers stayed away from the box office.

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The film brought in less than $50 million – despite the eye-watering production costs of $120 million. So it may be that Nicholson decided after this kind of failure he was no longer the draw at the box office that he had been. And, if that is true, he wouldn’t be the first actor to come to the same conclusion.

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After all, Gene Hackman has not been seen on screen again after 2004’s Welcome to Mooseport – which ended up being a commercial and critical flop. And Sean Connery decided that The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen was an apt swansong in 2003. Because although critics didn’t love that flick, it did make a lot of money – about $175 million, in fact.

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Yet as the 2010s wore on, and Nicholson continued to stay away from the silver screen, nobody was certain that he’d actually given movies up. After all, hiatuses are nothing new for the 83-year-old star. He had a four-year break before The Pledge and three before The Departed, for instance. And he certainly seemed no worse for the rest.

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But in the fall of 2013 Radar Online reported that a Hollywood source said the superstar had indeed retired. The reason given was a bombshell, too. According to the article, the insider said, “There is a simple reason behind his decision: it’s memory loss. Quite frankly… [Nicholson] has memory issues and can no longer remember the lines being asked of him. His memory isn’t what it used to be.”

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Around that time, it was also reported that Nicholson had passed on a role that he’d been tipped to take on. He’d been wanted for 2013’s Nebraska – whose central role seemed ideally suited to the acting legend. Nicholson didn’t show any interest, though, and the role went to Bruce Dern – who gained an Oscar nomination for his performance.

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Yet Nicholson is still a presence around town. According to Radar Online, the source said, “[He] has no intention of retiring from the limelight. He’s not retiring from public life, at all.” And the insider suggested that he had a reason for not announcing a retirement, saying, “He just doesn’t want a tribute. He’s happy to tacitly join the retirees club, like Sean Connery.”

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But people close to Nicholson soon struck back. They claimed that talk of retirement, let alone dementia, was completely untrue. In fact, NBC’s Maria Shriver told website E! News in September 2013 that the star had no plans to retire. And another person near to the star claimed that Nicholson was still reading scripts, intending to continue his career.

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And the man himself gave an interview to U.K. newspaper The Sun in which he dismissed concerns about his mental acuity. Amid quotes from existentialist philosopher Albert Camus and facts about the drug war, Nicholson noted, “I have a mathematician’s brain. It looks at everything mathematically, including relationships. It’s all statistics and laws of probability.”

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Yet Nicholson explained that he didn’t feel the same drive that he once had. He said, “I [learned] how to function within ‘out there.’ Then you get older, you change. I mean, I’m not a loner, I’m not a recluse, but I don’t need all that any more. I don’t enjoy it, simple as that. I’m not going to work until the day I die, that’s not why I started this. I mean, I’m not driven.”

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In fact, even when at his height, Nicholson had always been choosy over which roles he’d accept. He knocked back parts in Close Encounters of the Third Kind and The Godfather, for instance. It’s also claimed that he said no to many other roles, including the 2013 sports film 42 and 2014’s The Judge.

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In 2017 friend Peter Fonda told Page Six that he thought Nicholson “is basically retired” – although he did say that the star might return for something appealing. And for a while that looked like being a remake of Toni Erdmann – a 2016 German comedy that had taken the U.S. by storm and found its way into critics’ hearts.

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Original director Maren Ade gave the idea a big thumbs up, saying, “Jack Nicholson is one of the best actors that has ever been alive… I actually think I will enjoy sitting and watching a remake of Toni Erdmann.” However, even that high praise was not enough to keep Nicholson interested in the project, and he pulled out.

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So why did Nicholson stop starring in movies? Well, perhaps he just doesn’t feel that there is anything left for him to prove. After all, he’s a legend with three Oscars under his belt, from a dozen nominated performances, and countless other awards in his trophy cabinet. And it may be that he has simply decided that enough is enough – leaving a legacy of great films and wonderful starring roles.

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