After Receiving A Sentimental Request, A Jeweler Shared His Meticulous Method Of Creating The Ring

In spite of the modern age we live in, pieces of jewelry continue to be treasured across the planet. Whether it’s a sparkly ring or glittery necklace, these prized items are still handed down through the generations, becoming heirlooms. With that in mind, a craftsman named Daniel Cap faced an interesting challenge in 2018.

Now Cap, from Sydney, Australia, runs a custom jewelry business called Object Maker in his native land. And prior to this, he gained around a decade of experience working in the sector, showcasing his talents and skills. During that time, the Australian also became a specialist in one particular area.

Indeed, Cap looked to make his pieces by hand, compared to the more “modern” methods used within the industry. In fact, he’s now a specialist in crafting Mokume Gane jewelry. And this technique sees a number of colors mixed with gold, before creating a wood-like effect on the surface. Interestingly, the method dates back to 17th-century Japan, and was used to make swords.

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However, Cap’s work isn’t just restricted to Mokume Gane, as proved at the back-end of 2018. At that point, the business owner was asked to make a ring using special purple jewels. After taking on the job, he proceeded to share the results on Imgur that December. In fact, he charted his progress step by step on the image-sharing site.

Now in most households, people form emotional ties with various different objects and possessions. And they may not even do this consciously. Yes, from a photograph to a piece of clothing, these items can be cherished for a variety of reasons. But for a lot of people, though, pieces of jewelry are arguably more important than any other keepsake.

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What’s more, jewelry making has evolved throughout the centuries. For example, today customers now enjoy the benefits of the industry’s most advanced techniques, with pieces being produced en masse. But for thousands of years, crafters had to rely on their hands in a terribly time consuming task. Indeed, going even further back, the first piece of jewelry dates to before the time of homo sapiens.

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That’s right, several hand-crafted beads were discovered in the southern Spanish coast, which led to a fascinating revelation. In fact, the item was believed to be around 115,000 years old, meaning a neanderthal made it. Elsewhere, another object was found in Kenya as well, with researchers claiming that piece was over 40,000 years old. In fact, its pieces were made from ostrich egg shells.

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Since then, many other pieces of jewelry have stood the test of time, remaining in the same families for generations. On that note, the sentimental value of those items only goes up when they’re passed down to the next relative. Therefore, this ongoing mindset led to a significant moment for Daniel Cap come December, 2018.

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Mind you, from a young age it appeared Cap had aspirations of working with jewelry. Because he certainly focused on it at school. In 2005, the Sydney resident got a degree in Metal and Jewelry Arts. In addition to that, he then went to the Adelaide Center for the Arts, earning two more diplomas in four years.

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Afterwards, Cap found a job at Larsen Jewelry in 2014, where he went on to showcase his skills. However, in September 2016 the crafter’s career took an interesting turn, as he decided to start his own company. Furthermore, born out of a belief that it was time to become his own boss, he named it Object Maker.

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Now following that bold move, Cap’s jewelry business has since gained a large number of fans in Australia and elsewhere. Indeed, Object Maker’s official Instagram page boasts just over 900 followers. In addition, the company also has a website detailing the kind of work that the founder produces for his customers.

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With that in mind, Cap had a message for those who were interested in his services on the company’s website. “[We are] artisans of fine jewelry and bespoke objects that make a statement,” Cap wrote. “We work with clients on an individual basis to ensure quality of service and product.”

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What’s more, Cap then made a crucial point regarding his business. “Our work is not mass-produced,” he continued. “It is made in Australia to the highest standards, using traditional craftsmanship and adding modern technologies where these can be incorporated to realize truly original concepts.” The jeweler’s claims didn’t end there, though.

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At that point, Cap touched upon how he tried to involve customers in designing the actual pieces. “Most items are made to order at the request of the client,” he said on the website. “Whether based on a design in one of our collections, or a new design developed through a process of consultation with the client to provide a totally unique work of art made with rare skill and materials.”

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Moreover, the founder sought to further distance his company from typical high street jewelry stores. Indeed, he claimed on the website, “We ply our trade from a studio workshop rather than from behind the counter of a fancy, glitzy store. “Our expertise in working with all types of stones, minerals and metals ensures the advice you get is reliable.”

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And in exploring the importance of emotional ties to jewelry, the Sydney man went on to explain, “Object Maker is a young company that combines the skills of a variety of classically trained artisans to bring a fresh approach to one of the most ancient crafts. “We produce pieces of the highest quality that are designed to be valued today and for generations to come. We believe that every piece of jewelry has a specific meaning.”

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After this, the website delved further into the company’s mindset. “As well as tangible value inherent in material and craftsmanship, we also recognize the importance of emotional and intangible worth,” he continued. “Our design philosophy is intended to imbue these values into gems and jewelry to crystalize special moments into the timelessness of promise.”

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Furthermore, Cap added on the website, “This aim could be realized in many different forms to capture a memory of significance. In each case, the design should be appropriate to the intent of the owner and informed by the traditional science of talismans.” On that note, he then offered up some examples.

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But first, Cap emphasized that certain pieces of jewelry did not have to be over complicated in their emotional ties. In fact, he insisted that the human understanding of them came naturally. He said on the website, “A specific purpose could be embodied as a jacket pin honoring heroic service, a ring of engagement, a crown of power, a ring of purity. “These are not complex concepts – we all understand them intuitively.”

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From there, the company’s ultimate objective finally came to light. “Object Maker seeks to bring [these concepts] to awareness in order to define with greater intent the relationship between people and their significant jewels and objects of inherent worth,” the post concluded. “It is all about honor, enshrined in beauty and held within a form that is treasured for the value it holds.”

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Now the jewelry that continues to be made by Object Maker is certainly leaving a trail on social media. For example, the company’s images have earned hundreds of likes. But in December 2018, though, one job in particular grabbed people’s attention. Indeed, during that period, Cap received an intriguing request that would see him work with some special jewels.

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Remarkably, amethyst stones were jewels worn by both the ancient Egyptians and the ancient Greeks back in the day. According to some superstitious folk, the purple gems could stop you from getting drunk. Meanwhile, soldiers across Europe during the middle ages believed the stones could act as a form of protection.

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However, in the case of Cap’s anonymous customer, the jewels originally belonged to her grandparents and held important sentimental value. In fact, the Sydney specialist was tasked to make her a platinum ring that held them all in one place. And after taking on the assignment, he then shared his progress on the website Imgur.

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Ultimately established back in 2009, Imgur allows users to share their photos online, and has grown in stature ever since. Yes, thanks to the likes of Reddit and Facebook, more people started to take notice, leading to a big moment. Indeed, at the start of 2011, the site changed its base of operations.

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That’s right, Imgur left Athens, Ohio behind for San Francisco, California. And around 12 months later, the website registered some eye-opening numbers that proved its growth online. Incredibly, the photos on the site earned 360 billion views that year, while 300 million pictures were uploaded by users. Following that, the site went on to win an industry award.

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And by 2013, Imgur was now more popular than several competitors, beating out the likes of ImageShack and Photobucket. To follow that up, the service then became one of the top websites in America in the spring of 2016. Outside of the U.S., though, it attracted the attention of Cap in Australia.

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Posting under the username “objectmaker,” Cap has uploaded close to 40 posts on Imgur since he registered on the website. And due to his original content, the photos have earned him just under 40,000 points. Meanwhile, the jeweler’s post about the amethyst ring proved to be one of his most popular.

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So going back to the start of the post in December 2018, Cap explained the background of the client’s request. “The purple stones are amethyst from my customer’s grandparents’ jewelry collection,” Cap wrote. “They are worth nothing in commodity value, but everything in sentimental [value]. She really wanted to wear her family heritage jewels in a modern style ring.”

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At that stage, Cap quickly touched upon how hopeful he was of completing the project successfully. But his words didn’t end there, as he also made an interesting point. “I did my best to give [the customer] a memento from the past, that she might then give down the line in due time,” the jeweler continued.

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And his passion for jewelry making began to shine through. “I just love it when people show respect and share stories of those before them that gave their all,” Cap added. “I attached the making of it too, enjoy.” From there, the Australian business owner revealed his step-by-step guide to creating the platinum ring, accompanied by photographs.

To kick things off, Cap assembled various pieces of “raw platinum” that he washed before starting the process. In addition, he cleaned the amethyst stones, with one of the jewels looking a lot bigger than the others. After getting everything together, the Object Maker founder got to work. And perhaps dedicated to the client’s loved one, he entitled the step-by-step guide “For the Grandfather”.

So Cap began by selecting the flat piece of platinum on his table. Then, he marked this with a small blue circle in the middle. “[The] first step is to cut a space for the center stone,” the Sydney resident wrote on Imgur. “That center cut then gives the parallel line for the outer cut.”

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As he went on to explain, “Now you have the raw halo disc for the diamonds to eventually sit [in].” Off the back of that step, he used a couple of tools to shape the halo disc into what he described as a “dome.” This allowed the larger stone to be rested in the middle, mirroring what it would look like in a ring.

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Separately, another piece of platinum played the role of a “shank,” which would eventually form part of the ring. “The shank needs an undercarriage welded in place to complete the circle,” Cap wrote, before finishing that step. With the shank completed, the dome was subsequently attached to the top.

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Cap’s hard work didn’t end there, though, as he now needed to plan how to attach the other jewels. So on that note, he created several noticeable holes around the outside of the shank on both sides. At that point, the jeweler gave some insight into the process behind that particular step.

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As he went on to explain, “Here are the shoulder stone holes drilled and ready for setting preparation,” Cap explained below an image of the unfinished ring. “This stage takes some time. Each bead that holds the stones needs to be carefully revealed by chiseling away metal around it. I use a microscope because I like to look close to get it right.”

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After completing that meticulous stage, Cap snapped a photo of the ring with all of the amethyst stones in place. However, the finish line was still a short distance away, as he needed to clean the piece now. From there, the lapidary then took another photograph of the finished product.

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“So there’s the rough finish before polishing,” Cap wrote below the first image, ahead of switching focus to the second. “And here it is after a final polish. Looks pretty good in real life, my Samsung didn’t like the lighting much. There you have it! I hope you enjoyed the micro journey.”

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Indeed, Cap’s Imgur story finally came to an end, with a photo of the completed ring rounding things off. And the finished product looked absolutely stunning, drawing a big response on the website. Indeed, the post earned just under 2,000 points, under the Imgur scoring system, and more than 85,000 views.

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What’s more, Cap’s post also generated over 100 comments from online users, most of which were incredibly positive. But one message in particular stood out, as someone highlighted an interesting point. “Not too many people know how to work with amethyst,” the user wrote. “They’re usually considered not worth the effort. Great job! Beautiful.”

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